In Search of Annie Parker

UntitledThanks to support from the IUPUI Arts & Humanities Institute, the IU New Currents program, and several campus offices and departments as well as Indiana Humanities (the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities), the Frederick Douglass Papers will sponsor a gathering of scholars, teachers, students, and the general public to examine the historical and literary significance of Douglass’s novella, “The Heroic Slave” (1853), on our campus in October.

In preparation for this symposium, several members of the Douglass Papers staff have been engaged in a small piece of literary detective work. Douglass’s “Heroic Slave” was originally published as a contribution to the short “gift book” entitled Autographs for Freedom, published in Boston by the firm of John P. Jewitt. Besides Douglass, this collection of essays, poems, and short fiction features many well-known mid-nineteenth century writers and political and reform leaders including Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Sumner, Horace Greeley, John G. Whittier, and Caroline Dall.

Among the diverse collection of black and white, male and female, American and British contributors to Autographs is the writer Annie Parker who published a poem “Story Telling” and the separate story, “Passages in the Life of a Slave Woman.” In the latter, the narrator, a slave woman, recounts the tragic outcome of a master/slave sexual relationship. In the past few decades this piece has been anthologized several times as one of the earliest works of fiction by an African American author. But who was Annie Parker? None of the anthologies or scholars writing about the story have ever been able to supply any biographical details about her.

Project assistant editor Jeffrey Duvall, graduate research assistant Rebecca Pattillo, and I have been at work trying to answer that question this summer. Frederick Douglass’s own Rochester-published newspaper contains a piece under Parker’s byline in the early 1850s and two other short journalistic pieces by her appear in a Geneva, New York-based temperance newspaper in that same era. Then the trail gets cold, very cold.

Genealogical sources turn up a few possible “Annie Parkers” in the upstate New York region but none of them has any known connection to the antislavery movement and all were white. Perhaps Annie Parker was not a runaway slave as others have speculated. This raises the possibility that “Annie Parker” was a pen name–but whose?

The most intriguing possibility is that Parker is none other than Harriet Jacobs, the author of the famous 1859 autobiography of her horrifyingly abusive career as a South Carolina slave. Jacobs had escaped slavery in the early 1840s and worked as a maid for the Massachusetts journalist Nathaniel Parker Willis, who is referred to twice obtusely in Parker’s own writings. In 1849-50, two years before the publication of the Autographs, Jacobs lived in Rochester and actually worked in the same building where Douglass edited his newspaper. While Jacobs had returned to working for Willis in Massachusetts by the time Autographs was compiled, those earlier connections might have led the gift book’s editor, Julia Griffiths, to have solicited a piece by Jacobs, although no evidence of such a solicitation has yet been found. The same year, Harriet Beecher Stowe also asked Jacobs to write a summary of her slave experiences to include in her Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a response to critics of her condemnation of slave mistreatment in her earlier novel. The Douglass staff is exploring whether Jacobs might have wanted to tell her personal story herself in a safer fictional form in the pages of Autographs.

The product of this research will just be a small part of the upcoming symposium, where Douglass papers staff will be joined by seven widely-published scholars from several disciplines to explore various contexts of “the Heroic Slave.” The event is free and open to the public and we hope will be well-attended by many persons from the central Indiana community interested in Frederick Douglass and his campaign against slavery.

by Jack Kaufman-McKivigan

35th Indiana Association of Historians Annual Meeting hosted by IUPUI

voteRights, Riots, and Reactions

In the year 2015 we focus on civil rights, not only in the context of United States history, but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo,the Battle of New Orleans,the Congress of Vienna, the end of the Civil War, the passage of the 13th amendment, World War I,the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights), the end of World War II, and the passage of the Voting Rights Act.

Brian Dirck,Professor of History, Anderson University, will provide the keynote address. His first book,“Lincoln and Davis:Imagining America,1809-1865,”offered a comparative analysis of the two Civil War presidents’ lives and careers. He has since focused most of his attention on Abraham Lincoln. His publications include “Lincoln the Lawyer,”an overview of Lincoln’s legal career that was awarded the Benjamin Barondess Award from the New York Civil War Roundtable for the best book published on Abraham Lincoln in 2007. In 2012 he published “Lincoln and the Constitution,”as part of the Concise Lincoln Library Series,and “Lincoln and White America,”an analysis of Lincoln’s views concerning white supremacy and racism.

2015 IAH Annual Meeting Call for Papers

The Indiana Association of Historians (IAH) invites papers and panel proposals for its annual meeting to be held on the campus of IUPUI in Indianapolis,Indiana,on February 28,2015.

While papers and panels from all fields and related to all topics of history are welcomed,the program committee is particularly interested in proposals that focus on civil rights,not only in the context of United States history,but also from a global view of the struggle for equal rights. Possible “anniversary” topics suggested by the year 2015 include the Battle of Waterloo,the Battle of New Orleans,the Congress of Vienna,the end of the Civil War,the passage of the 13th amendment,World War I,the creation of the United Nations (leading to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights),the end of World War II,and the passage of the Voting Rights Act. Events leading up to these milestones and reaction to them are also encouraged as the basis of papers.

The committee also welcomes submissions in the fields of K-12 history education and public history. Academic,public,and independent historians,as well as graduate students,are eligible to present papers. All presenters must be present at the conference.

Conference papers (approximately 10 pages/2,500 words) may be based on original research,synthesis of scholarship,or participant experience. Sessions will consist of two or three papers with comments.

To submit a proposal for a paper and/or session,send a one-page proposal for each presentation and a one-page c.v. Panel proposals should include a one-page proposal,which specifies the topic each participant will discuss,and a one-page c.v. per participant.

The deadline for submitting paper and/or session proposals is November 10,2014. E-mail submissions are encouraged and will be accepted until the deadline.

Founded in 1980,the IAH is the statewide organization of historians with a mission to furnish opportunities for persons within the state’s historical community to become acquainted,to share research and ideas,to promote and strengthen the historical profession,and to encourage the pursuit of history by the general public. IAH members include historians who live or work in Indiana and specialize in various fields of history,not just Indiana history. Visit iahwebsite.org for membership information.

Submit proposals to:
IAH Program 2015
c/o IAH president, Nancy Conner
1500 N. Delaware Street,Indianapolis,IN 46202
Email:nconner@indianahumanities.org

Reception and Lecture | “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab” by Marianne Boruch on Oct. 30

Cadaver SpeakMarianne Boruch, “Cadaver, Speak: Poems from the Dissection Lab”
October 30, 2014
Reception: 6:00, Performance: 7:00-8:30
IUPUI Emerson Hall, Auditorium, EH 304
545 Barnhill Dr.

Some books begin as a dare to the self. Marianne Boruch’s newest collection, Cadaver, Speak, is an unsettling double, a heart of two chambers. The first half is attuned to history — how time hits us, and grief — and to art and its making. The second half, the title sequence, is spoken by a ninety-nine-year-old who donated her body for dissection by medical students, a laboratory experience in which the poet, duly silenced, was privileged to take part. Born from lyric impulse, which is Boruch’s scalpel, her work examines love, death, beauty, and knowledge—the great subjects of poetry made new by a riveting reimagining.

Marianne Boruch was born in Chicago in 1950. She is the author of seven collections of poetry including The Book of Hours (Copper Canyon Press, 2011), two volumes of essays on poetry, and a memoir. After receiving her MFA from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, she founded the MFA program at Purdue University in 1987. In addition to teaching at Purdue University, she also teaches at the low-residency MFA program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. Her recent awards include the Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award (2013), and a Fulbright/Visiting professorship at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Literature and Medicine Student Interest Group and the Department of Anatomy (IU School of Medicine), the Medical Humanities & Health Studies Program, and the Department of English (IU School of Liberal Arts).

Mike O’Connor presents “Two Santas: The Intellectual Roots of Conservative Tax Cutting”

A Commercial Republic Book Cover

Date: October 8, 2014
Time: 12:00-1:00
Location: IUPUI University Library 4115S (IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute)

“Tax-cutting is such a prominent concern among conservatives today that one could understandably believe it to be central to the meaning of conservatism. Yet this is not the case: during the middle of the twentieth century, conservatives were defined economically less by their hostility to taxes than by their commitment to balancing the federal budget. The shift between these two positions is largely the result of the influence of ‘supply-side’ economics, an intellectual orientation that arose in the 1970s as a response to a very specific set of economic circumstances. Once some conservatives noticed a political constituency for this position, however, their call to relieve the burden of taxes on the citizenry began to harden into an ideological position. The talk will explain the genesis of supply-side economics in the ‘stagflation’ of the 1970s and its conversion from an economic to a political doctrine in subsequent decades.”

Mike O’Connor is the author of A Commercial Republic: America’s Enduring Debate over Democratic Capitalism (Kansas, 2014). He has also published articles in Contemporary Pragmatism and The Sixties. O’Connor teaches at Georgia State University in Atlanta, and holds a Ph.D. in American studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was one of the original bloggers at the U.S. Intellectual History website, and served as a founding officer of the Society for U.S. Intellectual History.

Grant Opportunity: NSF Partnerships for Innovation: Building Innovation Capacity

NationalScienceFoundationThis grant supports academe-industry partnerships, which are led by an interdisciplinary academic research team with a least one industry partner to build technological, human, and service system innovation capacity. These partnerships focus on the integration of technologies into a specified human-centered smart service system with the potential to achieve transformational change in an existing service system or to spur an entirely new service system. These technologies have been inspired by existing breakthrough discoveries.

PFI:BIC funds research partnerships working on projects that operate in the post-fundamental discovery space but precede being on a clear path to commercialization. These projects require additional effort to integrate the technology into a real service system with human factors considerations, which in turn might spawn additional discoveries inspired by this interaction of humans with the technology.

Award Amount:

Awards may be up to $1,00,000 with an award duration of three (3) years. In other words, the total budget request to NSF for the lead institution and all others participating in the project cannot exceed $1,000,000. Ten awards of $1,000,000 each are anticipated. Inclusion of voluntary committed cost sharing is prohibited.

Eligibility:

·         Pay close attention needs to be paid to the Additional Eligibility Information.

·         The PI cannot concurrently be a PI on more than one active PFI:BIC award.

·         A PI who is named in a proposal in response to this program solicitation may not be named in a proposal for funding consideration in the same fiscal year to the Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research (PFI:AIR) program.

Limitation: Two per Indiana University    

Academic institutions are limited to participation on two (2) proposals as a lead institution preferably involving distinct application areas. A lead academic institution that has submitted a proposal has the option to participate as a subawardee on any other proposal submitted under this solicitation. Lead academic institutions that have submitted a proposal may also provide consultants to other proposals submitted under this solicitation.

To apply for IU Internal competition:

The selection process will include two phases.

 PHASE 1 – Letter of intent – Required

To be considered, submit a letter of intent which can be used to convey important aspects of the project, such as information about the required components: engineering, computer science, and social, behavioral and/or cognitive science and other scientific components and a preliminary list of participants to limsub@iu.edu by October 1, 2014. It can include:

  • Synopsis (Limit: 2500 characters, including spaces) convey important aspects of the project, such as information about not only the discipline(s) related to the technology, but also the disciplines to be included in this project: 1) systems engineering or engineering design, 2) computer science/information technology, and 3) human factors/behavioral science/cognitive engineering.
  • Other Comments (Limit: 2500 characters, including spaces)
  • Service System: Describe briefly the technology-based “smart” service system that is the focus of the project and how the technology will contribute to the creation or transformation of it. (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)
  • For the Primary Industrial Partner(s): Provide for each: Name, Founding Date, Number of Employees, Location (City & State), Commercial Revenues for the preceding calendar year, and Project Role (s). Reasonable abbreviations can be used. If you cannot accommodate the information, include the rest of the information under Other Comments (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)
  • Human Factors Tasks to be carried out which are essential to the operation of the Smart Service System: List a few major research activities which illustrate inclusion of human-centered considerations. (Limit: 255 characters, including spaces)

 If more than two internal LOIs are received, those submitting will be asked to participate in Phase 2.

PHASE 2 – Internal Application (only those submitting internal LOIs will be considered)

Submit the following documents electronically to limsub@iu.edu, by October 13, 2014 for internal coordination.

  • Project Summary consisting of an overview, a statement on the intellectual merit of the proposed activity, and a statement on the broader impacts of the proposed activity. (Limit: 1 page)
  • List of participating senior investigators (faculty level and equivalent) by full name, institutional affiliation, and departmental affiliation. (Limit: 1 page)
  • Brief project description that includes at least the following elements: the importance of the research discovery; how the partnership came about; the exciting potential of the discovery to expand what the technology can enable, including market needs that might be addressed; how the partnership might evolve if the project is successful; and how the outcomes of the collaboration across organizations and disciplines will be greater than the sum of the outcomes of the primary individual partners alone. (Limit: 2 pages)
  • Letter of support from Chair or Dean of submitting PI.
  • Abbreviated CV for the PI(s) (Limit: 2 pages each)

Limited Submission URL:  http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2336

IU Internal Letter of Intent Deadline (required): 10/1/2014

IU Internal Application Deadline: (if needed) 10/13/2014

 Required NSF Letter of Intent Deadline: 12/3/2014

NSF Full Proposal Deadline: 1/28/2015

IUPUI applicants must copy Etta Ward, emward@iupui.edu, on submissions.

IUPUI is a three-peat winner: Campus receives award for exemplary diversity initiatives

283091_w296INDIANAPOLIS — For the third year in a row, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis was selected to receive the 2014 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award from Insight Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education.

As a recipient of this national award that honors U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, IUPUI will be prominently featured in the magazine’s November 2014 issue.

“We are pleased to be recognized for all of the energy that has been built into distinct cultures, which has created and instilled diversity into our institution’s consciousness through practices and programs designed for all members of the IUPUI community,” said Karen Dace, IUPUI’s vice chancellor for diversity, equity and inclusion. “While we know there is still much work still ahead of us, we have opened more doors of opportunity for our students, faculty, staff and community partners.”

Insight Into Diversity also recognized IUPUI for its ability to embrace a broad definition of diversity on campus including gender, race, ethnicity, veterans, people with disabilities and members of the LGBT community. IUPUI was commended for making strides in the enrollment and graduation of minority students and for putting in place some distinctive diversity initiatives and inclusion programs. Highlights of the recognition include:

Diversity Enrichment and Achievement Program: Assists students of color in pursuing and obtaining their college degrees through an intensive retention program that addresses personal, academic and social experiences that have an impact on student success.

  • Office for Veterans and Military Personnel: Provides comprehensive resources to veterans and Veterans Affairs benefit recipients to aid in their overall success as IUPUI students.
  • Diversity Plans: Outlines goals for improving the climate for diversity in each school and administrative unit across campus.
  • Faculty and Staff Councils: Facilitates interaction, addresses issues and motivates, encourages and promotes the professional development of IUPUI faculty and staff. The Faculty and Staff Councils include Asian American and Pacific Islander; Black; Latino; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender; and Native American.
  • Faculty and Staff Diversity Awards: Recognizes faculty and staff who promote a campus climate where diversity is valued, energizes the appreciation of world cultures or champions for social justice.

“We hope the Higher Education Excellence in Diversity award serves as a way to honor those institutions of higher education that recognize the importance of diversity and inclusion as part of their everyday campus culture,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of Insight Into Diversity magazine.

Other awards

IUPUI was recently ranked as one of the nation’s top universities, as well as ranked No. 7 “Up and Coming” school and “Best College for Veterans” by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 edition of Best Colleges. The campus was also recognized for its learning communities and first-year experience for the 13th consecutive year by U.S. News, which highlighted IUPUI for offering programs that help ensure a positive collegiate experience for new freshmen and undergraduates.

For the second year in a row, Minority Access Inc. — a national nonprofit educational organization dedicated to improving diversity in education, employment and research — has recognized IUPUI for its commitment to diversity as a result of the programs and activities it has on campus that both enhance and promote an environment of inclusion.

Additionally, IUPUI was named among the 30 best non-Historically Black Colleges and Universities for minorities in the United States by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, a critical source of news, information and commentary on the full range of issues concerning diversity in American higher education.

Philosophy and the (Non – Academic) Professions : A Panel Discussion

UntitledIUPUI Campus Center,

Rm. 307

Thursday, 25 Sept., 4:30pm

Bring Plenty of Questions!

Is there any connection between philosophy (or, more generally, the humanities) and the (non-academic) professions? Can one enrich the other? Is philosophy (or the humanities) of any value to professionals? Our panelists will talk about these and related questions!

Panelists:

Jan Frazier (Management Consultant)

Jack Hope (Operator, Hope Plumbing Co.)

Emily Krueger (Manager, Foundation Partnerships, Best Friends Animal Society)

Richard Ranucci (Attorney at Law)

Patrick F. Sullivan (Principal Consultant, JBW Group International)

For more information contact:

Prof. John Tilley, IUPUI Dept. of Philosophy, 274-4690, jtilley@iupui.edu

2014 Barlow Lecture in the Humanities explores ‘The Future History of the Book’

imagesINDIANAPOLIS — Is there a need to fear the death of the book in this age of digital readers?

This is the question that will guide the 2014 John D. Barlow Lecture in the Humanities at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis on Oct. 29. The event is free and open to the public.

Kathleen Fitzpatrick, director of scholarly communication of the Modern Language Association and visiting research professor of English at New York University, will present the lecture, “The Future History of the Book: Time, Attention, Convention.”

The lecture will begin at 6 p.m. in the IUPUI Campus Center Theater, 420 University Blvd. A reception precedes the lecture in the Campus Center Theater Atrium at 5 p.m. The theater is located on the building’s lower level.

Anxieties abound regarding the ostensible obsolescence of the book. Exploring whether the book is in fact becoming obsolete, and what it might mean if it were, requires thinking distinctly about the specific material form of the book — the codex, that is, stacks of paper bound on one edge with front and back covers — and about the content it has long carried.
Fitzpatrick asks, if the form were to change — becoming digital, for instance — would our interactions with the content still make the book a viable vector for the cultural interactions the codex has supported? Would it be possible for us to find the powerful identification with the electronic book that we long have had with the codex book? And what might need to happen in order to effect such a transfer of our affections?

“We’re very glad to welcome Dr. Fitzpatrick to Indianapolis to present this year’s Barlow Lecture,” said William Blomquist, dean of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI. “This is a thought-provoking topic, and she is the ideal person to discuss it.”

Fitzpatrick is the author of two books, “Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy” (NYU Press 2011) and “The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television” (Vanderbilt University Press 2006). In 2006, she co-founded the digital scholarly network MediaCommons, a community network for scholars, students and practitioners in media studies that promotes the exploration of new publishing forms. Fitzpatrick’s articles have appeared in the Journal of Electronic Publishing, PMLA, Contemporary Literature and Cinema Journal.

The IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI hosts the Barlow Lecture in the Humanities in honor of Liberal Arts Dean and Professor Emeritus John D. Barlow.

To RSVP, email LibaRSVP@iupui.edu with “Barlow” in the subject line. Visitor parking is available in the Vermont Street Garage, attached to the Campus Center, for a fee.