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8th annual Museum Studies Portfolio Night

SLA at IUPUI logo

IUPUI Museum Studies students will share highlights from their Master’s degree E-portfolios. Please come support the newest members of the museum field.

A central feature of our Master’s program is that learning is integrally connected with doing. Students work in collaborative projects with community partners throughout their coursework and internships. At the end of their program MA students develop an electronic portfolio compiling highlights of their work and presenting it in a way that helps communicate who they are as emerging museum professionals, what they can and want to do in the field, and why they are committing themselves to the work that museums do in their communities.

For more information, visit the Museum Studies Program website or contact Rebecca Ellis rsmallma@iupui.edu.

2014 Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation

honors convocation

The Chancellor’s Academic Honors Convocation is a celebration of the outstanding achievements made by IUPUI faculty and students across all areas of IUPUI’s mission: excellence in teaching and learning; excellence in research, scholarship, and creative activity; excellence in civic engagement; and excellence in diversity, collaboration, and best practices.

This year’s ceremony for the 2013-14 academic year will be held on Friday, April 25, 2014, in the Hine Hall Auditorium on the IUPUI Campus and will begin at 3:00 p.m.

New Frontiers grants in the Arts and Humanities awarded to IU faculty

IU Logo

Thirty-two faculty members from six IU campuses have been awarded grants for their projects in arts and humanities through Indiana University’s 2013-14 New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program.

In 2014, New Frontiers enters its 10th year of supporting IU faculty in the arts and humanities. Initially funded by the Lilly Endowment Inc. starting in 2004, funding for New Frontiers was continued by IU President Michael A. McRobbie in 2010. The program is overseen and administered by IU’s Office of the Vice President for Research.

Over the past 10 years, the New Frontiers program has awarded funding to more than 680 IU faculty members. In the current round, funded projects include solo art installations, photography exhibitions, electronic music compositions, a book-length manuscript on painting in the 21st century and a symposium on the intersection between intellectual property and the arts.

“We’re very pleased to be able to continue to fund such a rich array of arts and humanities projects,” Vice President for Research Jorge José said. “The New Frontiers program is a unique opportunity for our faculty members, and we are very appreciative of President McRobbie’s commitment to supporting outstanding scholarship and creative activity in the arts and humanities.”

Currently, the New Frontiers program offers three types of grants: major awards of up to $50,000 (New Frontiers); smaller awards of up to $20,000 for workshops, symposia or small conferences (New Currents); and fellowships of up to $3,000 to support faculty travel (Exploratory Travel Fellowships).

The 2013-14 New Frontiers grant recipients are:
New Frontiers Grants
  • Blane De St. Croix, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “‘Dead Ice’ Production/Exhibition”
  • Jennifer Fleissner, English, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Maladies of the Will: Literature as a Symptomatology of Modernity”
  • Laura Foster, gender studies, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Re-inventing Hoodia: Patent Law, Benefit Sharing and Identity in Southern Africa”
  • John Gibson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “In Flight: a Composition for Chorus and Electronics”
  • Halina Goldberg, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Digital Scholarly Companion to ‘In Mrs. Goldberg’s Kitchen’
  • Jeffrey Hass, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Contemporary Dance-Based Multimedia Work With Original Computer Music”
  • Susan Hyatt, anthropology, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Between the National and the Local: The British Community Development Projects and the Creation of New Knowledge”
  • Herbert Timothy Lovelace, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “The World Is On Our Side: The Black Freedom Movement and the U.S. Origins of the U.N. Race Convention”
  • Robert Meyer-Lee, English, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, IU South Bend: “Valuing Middle English Literature Across the Divide: Literary Value in Chaucer, Langland, Audelay and Lydgate”
  • Osamu Nakagawa, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, IU Bloomington: “Memorial: Tracing the Past”
  • Jean Robertson and Craig McDaniel, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Rethinking Painting in the 21st Century”
  • Meredith Setser, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Agricultura Aesthetics”
  • Erich Holt Stem, music, School of Arts and Letters, IU Southeast: “America By: A Symphony Tour”
  • Eva White, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Who Is Irish? Roddy Doyle’s Hyphenated Identities”
  • Jeffrey Wolin, Henry Radford Hope School of Fine Arts, and Andrew Lumsdaine, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington: “The Art of Plenoptics: A Collaboration”
New Currents Grants
  • Konstantin Dierks, history, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Symposium: Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861”
  • Mark David Janis, Maurer School of Law, IU Bloomington: “Intellectual Property and the Performing Arts Symposium”
  • John Kaufman-McKivigan, history, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Frederick Douglass’s The Heroic Slave and the American Revolutionary Tradition: A Scholarly Symposium”
Exploratory Travel Fellowships
  • Julie Belz, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Re-conceptualizing Intercultural Communicative Competence”
  • Dennis Bingham, English, School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI: “Bob Fosse and the Revisionist Film Musical”
  • Matthew Bradley, political science, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, IU Kokomo: “Politics and Motivating the Next Generation of Public Servants”
  • Alisa Clapp-Intyre, English, IU East: “Reclaiming Children’s Voices: British Children’s Nineteenth-Century Diaries”
  • Melissa Dinverno, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Rewriting Lorca: Modernism, Publication, Folklore and (Trans)nationalisms in 1920-1930s Spain”
  • David Dzubay, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “New Work for Berlin Piano Percussion”
  • Amit Hagar, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Thou Shalt Not Commute: A Finitist Outlook on Probability in Statistical Physics”
  • Chu He, English, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “Narrating Trauma in Jennifer Johnston’s ‘O Ananias, Azarias, and Miseal’ and Mary Beckett’s ‘A Belfast Woman’”
  • Elizabeth Lloyd, history and philosophy of science, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Regional Climate Models, ‘Value Added,’ and ‘Model Robustness’”
  • Micheline Nilsen, history, College of Liberal Arts and Science, IU South Bend: “From Turnips to Lawn Chairs: Allotment Gardens in Europe, 1920-1975”
  • Kathleen O’Connell, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI: “Illustration Master Class 2014 at Amherst College”
  • Margaret Ryznar, McKinney School of Law, IUPUI: “The Ethics and Philosophy of Child Support as a Human Right”
  • Marietta Simpson, Jacobs School of Music, IU Bloomington: “Mosaic Melodies of the Diaspora”
  • Estella Vieira, Spanish and Portuguese, College of Arts and Sciences, IU Bloomington: “Female Figures in Fernando Pessoa”

Sarah Banks to discuss ethical challenges in research partnerships

sarah banks
Thursday, April 24th, 2014
2:00 – 3:30 p.m.
Education/Social Work (ES) Building, Room 2126, Global Crossroads Classroom

Dr. Sarah Banks, Durham University, UK, will deliver a lecture entitled “Tackling Ethical Challenges in Community-based Participatory Research.”

Community-based participatory research (CBPR) often involves community organizations and universities working together. The work of CBPR can help build community capacity in a time of austerity, generate new perspectives on social and economic issues and result in better implementation of research findings. CBPR is growing in popularity yet, both practically and ethically challenging are present in the work of CBPR.

In the work of CBPR, it is not always clear:

  • When people are in the role of researchers and/or research subjects;
  • When people’s work should be credited and when anonymity is important;
  • Who owns and has rights to the data/findings;
  • How to navigate the institutional ethical review process;
  • How to guard against exploitation of one party by another;
  • How to be open about unequal power relationships; and
  • How to achieve greater equality and mutual respect.

During the session, Dr. Sarah Banks will discuss the types of ethical issues that arise in CBPR, the practical challenges that community organizations and universities confront when they collaborate on research projects, and useful strategies for tackling these issues in practice. Reference will be made to Community-based Participatory Research: A Guide to Ethical Principles and Practice (2012) and accompanying case materials, films, podcasts, and exercises for promoting ethical awareness, reflection and action. More information about CBPR can be found on the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement website (UK).

Register for this event here.

Co-sponsored by the IUPUI Center for Service and Learning, IUPUI Department of Anthropology, IUPUI Solution Center, IUPUI Translating Research Into Practice (TRIP), IUPUI Office of External Affairs.

Harpo Foundation 2014 emerging artists fellowship

harpo foundation

The Chicago-based Harpo Foundation was established in 2006 to support under-recognized artists. The foundation seeks to stimulate creative inquiry and encourage new modes of thinking about art.

The foundation’s Emerging Artist Fellowship at the Santa Fe Art Institute was established in 2013 to provide an annual opportunity to an emerging visual artist who is at least 25 years old and who needs time and space to explore ideas and start new projects. Artist fellows will receive a one-month residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute, which includes a well-appointed room with private bath, well-lit studio space, and a $500 travel stipend.

Founded in 1985, the Santa Fe Art Institute provides a unique opportunity for emerging artists to pursue creative projects without interruption. SFAI supports over fifty residents per year and offers a cohesive, arts-focused environment that creates the ideal working conditions for resident artists. Living and studio space is located within a nearly 17,000-square-foot complex designed by renowned Mexican architect Ricardo Legoretta. The unique SFAI environment allows residents to be as interactive or private as they wish. There are no requirements on the work produced during an artist’s time at SFAI.

One fellowship is awarded annually to an emerging artist who demonstrates strong artistic ability and promise, as well as an evolving practice at a pivotal moment in his or her development.

For complete program guidelines, information about previous fellowship recipients, and applications instructions, see the Harpo Foundation Web site.

Look/See 2014 at Herron

look see 2014
Look/See 2014
May 1, 2014
4:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Look/See 2014, Herron’s biggest night of the academic year, recognizes the achievements of Herron’s graduating master’s degree candidates with the M.F.A. Exhibition, which will fill all the galleries in Eskenazi Hall and the Eskenazi Fine Arts Center. Come celebrate with students, friends and family, faculty and guests.

The candidates, who come from nine states and represent Ceramics, Furniture Design, Painting, Photography, Printmaking and Sculpture are: Steven S. Baker, Denise Conrady, Lauren Anne Davis, Michael Helsley, Melissa Michelle Hopson, Margaret Elizabeth Ingram, Sarah Kasch, Samuel R. Ladwig, C.J. Martin, John Collins McCormick, Hillary Russell, Marna Lee Shopoff, Freeland Southard, Bridgit Stoffer, Colin Tury, Stephanie Kristen Erin Wichman, Elizabeth Wierzbicki and David Woolf.

The Annual Honors and Awards Ceremony for undergraduate students and their families kicks off the celebration at the IUPUI Campus Center, 420 University Blvd., beginning at 4:00 p.m. All are welcome.

May 1, 2014 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.:

  • School-wide open houses at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St., and Eskenazi Fine Arts Center, 1410 Indiana Ave.
  • The 2014 M.F.A. Exhibition
  • Chelsea Stillwell: Celebrating Her Artistic Life Memorial Exhibition, in the Photography Department
  • Tours of open studios
  • Food and entertainment

See the full program here.

Indiana history journal examines public art and controversy

IMH

Art, race and space fill the most recent issue of the Indiana Magazine of History. In an issue guest-edited by Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis public historian Modupe Labode, leading scholars of public art and urban life show how art can reveal fault lines in modern society.

The March 2014 issue features four articles reflecting on the artwork that prompted IUPUI’s recent symposium, “Art, Race and Space”: artist Fred Wilson’s proposed “E Pluribus Unum” sculpture, which re-imagined a new identity for the freed slave portrayed on the Soldiers and Sailors Monument in downtown Indianapolis. Wilson’s work, commissioned for the city’s Cultural Trail, was ultimately canceled after long and intense public controversy.

In her introduction to this special issue, Labode, who helped organize the original symposium, revisits the contentious history of Wilson’s proposal. She reviews the public struggles over the freedman image and its placement in the city center, and the tensions of race, class and public space discussed by symposium members. Wilson himself follows with a discussion of monuments and memorials that have inspired his work and comments on some of his installations for museums in New York City and Savannah, Ga.

Art historian Bridget Cooks looks at Wilson’s work in light of the conflicting ideals of preservation and activism. Geographers Owen Dwyer and Matthew McCourt examine the history of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail and consider the relationship of the public spaces and public art along its eight miles.

Two articles examine other public artworks that have spoken to and created public controversy outside Indiana. Art historian Renée Ater studies the public outcry that followed the commissioning by Rocky Mount, N.C., of a statue of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Historian Erika Doss discusses a Duluth, Minn., public memorial to three young black men who were lynched in that city in 1920, arguing that such public art can “generate profound responses of renewal and reconciliation.”

The Indiana Magazine of History is published quarterly by the history department of Indiana University Bloomington. For general information on the articles or to order a copy of the issue, contact the editorial office at 812-855-4139.

IUPUI faculty and students help FBI identify cultural artifacts

larry zimmerman

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis anthropology and museum studies faculty and students are assisting the FBI in identifying and preserving cultural artifacts found in the home of a Rush County, Ind., man.

The FBI and its multidisciplinary team are working on repatriating items of cultural patrimony.

Larry J. Zimmerman, professor of anthropology and museum studies; Holly Cusack-McVeigh, assistant professor of anthropology and museum studies; and Charmayne “Charli” Champion-Shaw, director of the Office of America Indian Programs at IUPUI, are among the art, cultural and museum experts working as consultants at the site about 35 miles southeast of Indianapolis.

“Our job is to assist the FBI in the identification of artifacts, help as liaisons with Native Americans and take care of the artifacts in keeping with best museum practices and FBI evidential procedures,” Zimmerman said. Zimmerman also holds the title of Public Scholar of Native American Representation, a shared position with the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI and the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art.

Students and alumni of museum studies classes taught by Cusack-McVeigh, also Public Scholar of Collections and Community Curation, are helping to handle the artifacts as they are registered, photographed and packaged.

The IUPUI faculty and students participated in an FBI briefing April 1 and a press conference April 2 about the matter. At this time, the IUPUI professors and students are not available for additional media interviews.

2014 Smith Richardson fellowship on international and foreign studies

smith richardson

Dearline: June 15, 2014.

The Smith Richardson Foundation is pleased to announce its annual Strategy and Policy Fellows grant competition to support young scholars and policy thinkers on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, military policy, and diplomatic and military history.

The purpose of the program is to strengthen the U.S. community of scholars and researchers conducting policy analysis in these fields.

The Foundation will award at least three research grants of $60,000 each to enable the recipients to research and write a book. Within the academic community, this program supports junior or adjunct faculty, research associates, and post-docs who are engaged in policy-relevant research and writing. Within the think tank community, the program supports members of the rising generation of policy thinkers who are focused on U.S. strategic and foreign policy issues.

Applicants must be an employee or affiliate of either an academic institution or a think tank.

Please note that the Fellowship program will only consider single-author book projects. It will not consider collaborative projects (e.g., edited or multi-author books, conference volumes or reports, or a collection of previously published articles, chapters or essays.)

For information regarding the application procedure and the required proposal format, please e-mail: strategyfellows@srf.org

Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc.

60 Jesup Road

Westport, CT 06880

 

2014 Italian Film Festival schedule announced

italian film fest 2014

The Italian program in the Department of World Languages and Cultures at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will host the Italian Film Festival, April 12 through May 10. The festival showcases nine films, including two documentaries.

“Once again the program in Italian brings a taste of Europe to IUPUI and Indianapolis with this year’s edition of the Italian Film Festival, showing the best in recent Italian filmmaking,” said professor Marta Anton, chair of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, part of the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Indianapolis is one of 11 cities participating in the festival. All films will be presented with English subtitles and are free and open to the public. The Indianapolis series is sponsored by Fiat and the Italian Cultural Institute of Chicago in collaboration with IUPUI and the IUPUI Italian Club.

The films will be shown at either the Lilly Auditorium of the IUPUI University Library, 755 W. Michigan St., or the IUPUI Campus Center Theatre, 420 University Blvd.

The films, times and locations are:

  • “Viva L’Italia,” 2 p.m. Saturday, April 12, IUPUI University Library, Lilly Auditorium. A sudden illness results in politician Michele Spagnolo saying anything that comes into his head and doing whatever he wants, with hilarious consequences. (Comedy, 111 min)
  • “Gli Equilibristi” (“Balancing Act”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 13, Lilly Auditorium. A critical error causes Giulio’s life to unravel. Through a series of events, Giulio discovers how thin the line truly is between well-being and poverty. (Comedy, 100 min)
  • “Bianca Come Il Latte, Rossa Come Il Sangue” (“White as Milk, Red as Blood”), 2 p.m. Saturday, April 19, Lilly Auditorium. Leo is a typical 16-year-old who finds school agonizing. Then, a new teacher encourages him to follow his dreams, which include an unattainable fellow student with fiery red hair. (Drama, 102 min)
  • “Viva La Liberta” (“Long Live Freedom”), 7 p.m. Friday, April 25, IUPUI Campus Center Theatre. When the leader of a political opposition party disappears, his wife and assistant turn to his identical twin brother, who was recently released from a psychiatric hospital. Will anyone notice the switch? (Drama, 93 min)
  • “Il Rosso E Il Blue” (“The Red and Blue”), 4 p.m. Sunday, April 27, Lilly Auditorium. Set in a Roman school are the stories of an art history professor who has lost his passion for the job, a young substitute who is trying to save a rebel student and a stern head mistress who is forced to deal with a student who has been forgotten by his mother. (Comedy, 98 min)
  • “Teorema Venezia” (“The Venice Syndrome”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 3, Campus Center Theatre. Venice, the world’s most beautiful city, has 48,000 residents, and there are fewer every year as the city is becoming almost uninhabitable. The film shows what remains of Venetian life. (Documentary, 80 min)
  • “La Migliore Offerta” (“The Best Offer”), 7 p.m. Friday, May 9, Campus Center Theatre. An antiques expert is appointed to oversee the sale of a beautiful heiress’s priceless art collection and is soon engulfed by a passion that rocks his bland existence. (Drama, 124 min.)
  • “Women Workers’ War,” 5 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. A documentary about two women: one who leads the longest factory sit-in by women in Italy, the other who operates a cookie factory that also encourages cultural and personal growth among the workers. (Documentary, 54 min)
  • “Il Gioellino” (“The Jewel”), 7 p.m. Saturday, May 10, Campus Center Theatre. The founder of an international conglomerate places his closest relatives and trusted managers in key positions, but they are unfit to face the challenges of today’s market. (Drama, 110 min)

For more information, view the event flyer or contact professor Cristiana Thielmann at 310-989-2810 orcthielma@iupui.edu.