Emerging Voices: You Are A Writer

Emerging Voices is a literary fellowship that aims to provide new writers, who lack access, thwith the tools they will need to launch a professional writing career. The eight-month fellowship includes:

PROFESSIONAL MENTORSHIP: Emerging Voices Mentors are carefully chosen from PEN Center USA’s membership and from professional writers based in Los Angeles. The Mentor-Fellow relationship is expected to challenge the fellow’s work and compel significant creative progress. Over the course of the fellowship, Emerging Voices Fellows and Mentors should meet three times in person, and be in contact at least once a month. In these three meetings, Mentors will offer written feedback on the Emerging Voices Fellows’ work in progress. Authors who have been mentors in the past include Ron Carlson, Harryette Mullen, Chris Abani, Ramona Ausubel, Meghan Daum, and Sherman Alexie.

CLASSES AT THE UCLA EXTENSION WRITERS’ PROGRAM: Participants will attend two free courses (a 12-week writing course and a one-day workshop) at UCLA Extension, donated by the Writers’ Program. Program Manager will assist the Emerging Voices Fellows with course selection.

AUTHOR EVENINGS: Every Monday, fellows will meet with a visiting author, editor or publisher and ask questions about craft. Fellows must read each visiting author’s book before the evening. A schedule of Author Evenings will be distributed at the first Emerging Voices orientation meeting. Authors who have participated in the past have included Jonathan Lethem, Percival Everett, Maggie Nelson, Cynthia Bond, Aimee Bender, Jerry Stahl, and Bruce Bauman, senior editor of the literary magazine Black Clock.

MASTER CLASSES: After completing the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program courses, Emerging Voices Fellows will enroll in a Master Class. The Master Class is a genre-specific workshop with a professional writer that affords fellows the opportunity to exchange feedback on their works in progress. Previous Master Class Instructors have included Diana Wagman, Alex Espinoza , and Paul Mandelbaum.

VOLUNTEER PROJECT: All Emerging Voices Fellows are expected to complete a 25-hour volunteer project that is relevant to the literary community. A few of the organizations that have participated included WriteGirl, 826LA, Cedars-Sinai Hospital, and STARS – San Diego Youth Services.

VOICE INSTRUCTION CLASS: The Fellowship will provide a one-day workshop with Dave Thomas, a professional voice actor. The Emerging Voices Fellows will read their work in a recording studio and receive instruction on reading their work publicly.

PUBLIC READINGS: Fellows will participate in three public readings, The Welcome Party, Tongue & Groove Salon, and the Final Reading. Fellows have read in various venues and events including the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, Silver Lake Jubilee, Skylight Bookstore, The Standard, Downtown LA. and Hotel Café. For the past five years, the fellowship has culminated in a Final Reading held in Hammer Museum’s Billy Wilder Theater, showcasing the progress each fellow has made in his or her work.

STIPEND: The fellowship includes a $1,000 stipend, given in $500 increments.

Participants need not be published, but the fellowship is directed toward poets and writers of fiction and creative nonfiction with clear ideas of what they hope to accomplish through their writing.

Deadline for applications: August 10, 2015
The Emerging Voices Fellowship runs from January to July.

Download the application here.

The Mirror of Landscape: An Interactive Discussion with Rebecca Allan and Jason M. Kelly

The Mirror of Landscape AdvertDate: June 4, 2015
Time: 7 pm
Location: DeBoest Lecture Hall, Indianapolis Museum of Art
Tickets are free and available here

Landscape painting has long provided humans with an artistic form for contemplating the relationship between nature, society, and culture. It is a profoundly engaging and intellectually powerful mode of expression that has served a host of purposes over the last 300 years — from buttressing social hierarchy to criticizing injustice to highlighting scientific discovery to expressing human hopes and anxieties.

In this interactive discussion, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Dr. Jason M. Kelly, Associate Professor of History and Director of the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, will engage the audience in a conversation about the role of landscape painting in mediating our relationship with the environment and with each other. We will explore five paintings, created between 1750 and 2015. The discussion will end in a visit to the IMA’s Pont-Aven gallery to examine Paul Gauguin’s Flageolet Player on the Cliff.

Presented by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project.

RESEARCH NOTICE: NEH Summer Stipends – Limited Submission

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to NEH Logohumanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
· projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
· projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
· specific policy studies;
· research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
· the preparation or revision of textbooks;
· curriculum development;
· the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
· educational or technical impact assessments;
· empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
· inventories of collections;
· the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
· the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
· works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
· Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
· All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
· Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
· Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
· See Program details for more specific information.

INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
· independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
· college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
· emeritus faculty; and
· adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.

Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon.
The narrative limitation does not include references.
Limited Submission URL:  http://limsub.iu.edu/limsub/LimSubDetail.asp?Number=2320

IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Indiana University researchers awarded grant to study employment behavior of artists

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — With a newly announced grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, two Indiana University researchers will examine key economic issues facing IU Logoartists.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs faculty members Doug Noonan and Joanna Woronkowicz will use data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey and data from crowdfunding websites including Kickstarter and Indiegogo to study these questions:

What was the effect of the Great Recession on the employment of artists and how have they fared during the recovery?
How do crowdfunding campaigns for arts projects differ in their results from similar campaigns for technology and other non-arts projects?

The $15,000 research grant is one of only 19 research projects nationwide funded by the NEA through its Research: Art Works program.

“We want to better understand the role of artists in creating economic value,” Noonan said. “We want to develop data that shows the impact of artists on the economic fabric of society.”

Tracking employment and salary for artists is difficult because of the nature of their work. They have flexibility in schedules, often hold multiple jobs and can be footloose in regard to where they live and work.

“We know a good deal about artists from data taken at a particular moment in time, but this research goes in a new direction,” Woronkowicz said. “By studying how artists work and move across years and during a sustained and challenging economic period, we can get a much broader understanding of how they survive and how, as a society, we can help them thrive.”

Noonan and Woronkowicz will analyze data from the 2003-14 Current Population Surveys as well as data from Kickstarter and Indiegogo from 2009 to 2014.

“We hope to create data sets that other researchers can use to further define the economic contributions of artists,” Noonan said. “They enrich our lives in so many ways, but too little is known about the many ways artists earn a living.”

Noonan is a professor at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. He is also research director for the IU Public Policy Institute. Woronkowicz is an assistant professor at SPEA at IU Bloomington.

Pleasant Run Walk and Sketch

Rebecca AllanIn this engaging nature walk, New York based artist Rebecca Allan and Tom Swinford, Assistant Division Director of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, will lead participants in creating nature drawings and poetry while learning about the ecology of Pleasant Run. Encouraging us to connect to and reflect on this important Indianapolis waterway, this event will culminate in the on-site creation of an electronic book of artwork, photos, and poetry.

We will meet at the Barth Avenue Bridge along the Pleasant Run Trail at 10:00 am. Street parking is available along Barth Avenue. A map is available here.

This event is free and all materials will be provided to participants.

This event is sponsored by the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, the Rivers of the Anthropocene Project, Big Car, Reconnecting to Our Waterways, Prizm: The Artist’s Supply Store, the Butler University Center for Urban Ecology, Earth Charter Indiana, and the da Vinci Pursuit.

Register here:

Co-sponsors:

Scholarships Available for the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute

We are pleased to announce that the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute will offer four full scholarships to the 2015 Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) Institute which will take place on IUPUI’s campus from Monday, July 27th through Friday, July 31st.

To apply for the scholarship, please send a 1-2 page letter of application to iahi@iupui.edu by May 22. In the letter, clearly outline how attendance at the HILT Institute will assist you in your current or future research or professional development in the arts or humanities. Please attach a 2-page CV to the email.

All full-time tenured and tenure-eligible faculty from all schools and units at IUPUI are eligible to apply. Under certain circumstances, non-tenure-track faculty members whose evaluation criteria include research or creative activity may also be eligible with an explanation in a letter of support from their chair or dean.

Please see the list of courses below. For additional information and detail on the events and schedule, click here.

HILT 2015 is sponsored by the Center for Digital Scholarship at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis University Library, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland, and MATRIX: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University.     

 

HILT LogoCROWDSOURCING CULTURAL HERITAGE

led by Mia Ridge and Ben BrumfieldSuccessful crowdsourcing projects help organizations connect with audiences who enjoy engaging with their content and tasks, whether transcribing handwritten documents, correcting OCR errors, identifying animals on the Serengeti or folding proteins. Conversely, poorly-designed crowdsourcing projects find it difficult to attract or retain participants. This class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. We’ll study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons which might apply to humanities projects. We’ll discuss models for quality control over user-generated projects, explore the cross-overs between traditional in-house volunteer projects internet-enabled crowdsourcing, and look at the numbers behind real-world projects. Finally, the course will give students hands-on experience with several different crowdsourcing platforms for image annotation, manuscript transcription, and OCR correction. Students are encouraged to bring their project ideas and some scanned material for the lab sessions.

DE/POST/COLONIAL DIGITAL HUMANITIES

led by Roopika Risam and micha cárdenas

“…we must discuss, we must invent…”
—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

From Sandra Harding’s interventions in postcolonial science studies to Radhika Gajjala’s articulation of digital subalternity to Kavita Philip’s work on postcolonial computing, postcolonial approaches to technology have provoked lively discussion. New conversations have emerged around essential questions: can the digital be “decolonized?”; what are the limits of decolonial, postcolonial, or anti-colonial approaches to digital cultures?; and how can these theoretical approaches be marshaled to build communities, tools, and justice?Together, we will explore these questions at the intersections of theory and praxis as we consider how tools can be theorized, hacked, and used in service of decolonization. This course undertakes this task through three goals: 1) learning about, understanding, analyzing the history and present processes of colonization, decolonization, neocolonialism and the postcolonial, with attention to local, hemispheric and global contexts; 2) analyzing digital technologies, with attention to how they intersect with humanities disciplines such as art, literature and performance, and how they produce, reproduce or enact processes of colonization; and 3) inventing new and/or alternative technologies, or new uses of existing technologies, that work against colonization and post-colonial legacies that maintain social injustice.

Our days will be spent engaging with theory, hands-on experimentation, and reflection on practice. Theoretical topics may include digital labor, subalternity, embodiment, and aesthetics. Applied activities may include Scalar-based game design, mobile media/film/photography, digital exhibits, and mapping. In the spirit of our theoretical approach, we emphasize accessiblity and low-cost technology, as well as creativity and interpretation. Therefore, no prior experience with theory or practice is required, just an openness to discuss and invent the theories and practices of De/Post/Colonial Digital Humanities.

DIGITAL ACCESSIBILITY: DESIGNING AND ADAPTING PROJECTS FOR ALL USERS

led by George Williams and Erin Templeton

In order to successfully reach a wide audience, digital projects must take into account the variety of potential users and their diverse needs.. Not everyone accesses information in the same way, though we often assume otherwise. For example, people with disabilities of many different kinds–sensory, physical, and cognitive–represent a significant percentage of users for many digital projects, but most of these projects are designed without thinking about accessibility. However, digital humanists can ensure that they are designing for all users by taking accessibility into account from the beginning of a project. And existing projects can be adapted to improve their accessibility.

This course will take a two-fold approach: students will read and discuss key works from disability studies scholarship in order to consider various applications for the digital humanities; these readings will form a critical framework for students’ hands-on work with tools that enable them to evaluate and create scholarly digital resources. Mornings will involve readings-based discussions on topics such as emerging standards for accessibility in digital environments, the social model of disability, user-centered design, and embodiment. Afternoons will be reserved for guided individual exercises and small-group work. Students are encouraged to bring their own projects or project ideas in order to evaluate them for accessibility and to make or plan changes as appropriate. Knowledge of and experience with web design is not required, but curiosity and a willingness to learn are a necessity.

DIGITAL PEDAGOGY AND NETWORKED LEARNING

led by Lee Skallerup-Bessette and Jesse Stommel

Many argue digital humanities is about building stuff and sharing stuff, reframing the work we do in the humanities as less consumptive and more curatorial—less solitary and more collaborative. In this workshop, participants will experiment with ways technology can be used to build learning communities within the classroom, while also thinking about how we can connect our students to a much larger global classroom. We’ll start at the level of the syllabus, thinking about how we organize and structure hybrid courses and digital assignments, before delving into specific tools and critical orientations to technology.

Participants should expect that the workshop will be hands-on, collaborative, and iterative; we will be using and building, experimenting with the pedagogy we are learning, making our learning environment as we go. The course has no prerequisites. We will work together across skill levels, experimenting with new tools, while adapting and remixing our pedagogies. This isn’t about digital tricks or gimmicks, but a profound re-examination of how we teach. The best digital tools inspire us, often to use them in ways the designer couldn’t anticipate. The worst digital tools attempt to dictate our pedagogies, determining what we can do with them and for whom. The digital pedagogue teaches her tools, doesn’t let them teach her.

DIGITAL STORYTELLING

led by Jarom McDonald

When YouTube launched to the public in 2005, the now-ubiquitous red play-button logo contained a simple yet powerful tagline, “Broadcast Yourself.” Inherent in such an imperative is a concept that’s at the core of this course — in today’s wired world, digital video is a powerful storytelling medium, one that can influence constructions of identity, community, culture, and the nature of narrative itself. In this course, we’ll explore the interactivity and narrative of digital video by positioning it as a tool for seeing, exploring, expressing and critiquing within the digital Humanities.

We will look at the various forms of dynamic storytelling, investigate the history of the video medium and what bearing it plays on the broadcast zeitgeist of today, explore formal techniques of digital storytelling including subjectivity, sequencing and transitioning, rhythm and repetition, interactivity, linearity, and meta-narration, tackle analytic tasks such as video annotation and video data analysis, and grapple with the physics of representing moving images in digital form. We will also emphasize, in addition to understanding the theories and specificities of digital video, how we might start acquiring production skills — including exposure to multimedia editing tools, working with codecs and compression, and, of course, leveraging online video dissemination channels such as YouTube. Ultimately, this class allows for students to begin to develop a critical perspective of engaging with digital video in the Humanities as a way to articulate fundamental, narrative-driven application of these rapidly changing paradigms.

Students will need to bring with them a new-ish laptop and a cell-phone (or other portable device) capable of shooting video, but no other equipment is needed nor knowledge assumed.

GETTING STARTED WITH DATA, TOOLS, AND PLATFORMS

led by Brandon Locke, Thomas Padilla, and Dean Rehberger

Starting a digital humanities research project can be quite intimidating. This course is designed to make that process less so by exploring tools and platforms that support digital humanities research, analysis, and publication. We will begin by reframing sources as data that enable digital research. We will work throughout the week on approaches to (1) finding, evaluating, and acquiring (2) cleaning and preparing (3) exploring (4) analyzing (5) communicating and sharing data. Emphasis will be placed across all stages on how to manage a beginner digital research project in such a way that helps to ensure that your project remains accessible, that the process is well documented, and that the data are reusable.

Throughout this course, we will examine several existing projects, and move through the process of collecting, cleaning, and structuring humanities data and sources and plugging them into tools and platforms to analyze, visualize, share, and publish the data and analysis. Exploration of these stages of project-building will include a technical walk-through, as well as an examination of the tools and their underlying methodologies. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring their own research material to work with, but sample data will be provided.

HUMANITIES DATA CURATION PRAXIS

led by Trevor Muñoz and Katie Rawson

This course is for people who have or are making textured, rich humanities data and want to be able to use, share, and preserve their information. We will take a multi-faceted approach to the challenges of curating data that integrates

* immediate, practical concerns of preparing, transforming, and analyzing data,
* strategic tasks of mapping data models and developing maintenance plans,
* and foundational thinking about the role of data curation in research.

We will move between hands-on work with data sets and tools to discussions about the nature of data curation. Working with the tools like IPython notebooks and OpenRefine and with open data sets in a variety of formats from institutions like the Metropolitan Museum and the Digital Public Library of America, we will explore topics such as defining data quality and identifying data problems; translating data models between different systems; developing best practices for data reuse and interchange. Participants will be able to use data from their own research or work with practice sets we will supply.

We ask that people who take this course have some experience using open source software, including reading technical documentation and help forums, and that they have a basic understanding of programming (e.g. what is a variable, some familiarity with loops, etc.). Please contact the instructors if you need guidance in attaining these prerequisites in time for HILT.

HUMANITIES PROGRAMMING

led by Brandon Walsh and Wayne Graham

This course focuses on introducing participants to humanities programming through the creation and use of the Ruby on Rails web application framework. This course will introduce programming and design concepts, project management and planning, workflow, as well as the design, implementation, and deployment of a web-based application. Technologies covered in this course will include git, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Ruby, Rails, and relational (and non-relational) data stores. Over the course of the week, we will work through the practical implementation of a developing and deploying a small-scale web application.

LARGE-SCALE TEXT ANALYSIS WITH “R”

led by Mark Algee-Hewitt

Text mining, the practice of using computational and statistical analysis on large collections of digitized text, is becoming an increasingly important way of extracting meaning from writing. Whether working on survey data, medical records, political speeches or even digitized collections of historical writing, we are now able to use the power of computational algorithms to extract patterns from vast quantities of textual data. This technique gives us information we could never access by simply reading the texts. But determining which patterns have meaning and which answer key questions about our data is a difficult task, both conceptually and methodologically; particularly for those who work in the humanities who are able to benefit the most from these methods.

Large-Scale Text Analysis with R will provide an introduction to the methods of text mining using the open source software Environment “R”. In this course, we will explore the different methods through which text mining can be used to “read” text in new ways: including authorship attribution, sentiment analysis, genre studies and named entity extraction. At the same time, our focus will also be on the analysis and interpretation of our results. How do we formulate research questions and hypothesis about text that can be answered quantitatively? Which methods fit particular needs best? And how can we use the numerical output of a text analysis to explain features of the texts in ways that make sense to a wider audience?

While no programming experience is required, students should have basic computer skills and be familiar with their computer’s file system. Participants will be given a “sample corpora” to use in class exercises, but some class time will be available for independent work and participants are encouraged to bring their own text corpora and research questions so they may apply their newly learned skills to projects of their own.

PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

led by Simon Appleford and Jennifer Guiliano

This course will explore the fundamentals of project planning and design including, but not limited to: formulating appropriate disciplinary questions for digital humanities research, investigating digital humanities tools and resources, structuring your first project, critical path scheduling, understanding roles and responsibilities, risk management, documenting your project work, writing your first grant proposal, budget setting and controls, building the project team, and selecting and implementing project management tools and software.

This is an advanced course and, as such, you are expected to have an understanding of the definition of digital humanities. Materials will be covered through lectures, discussions, presentations, and hands-on activities. Participants will get the most from the course if they arrive with at least some sense of a potential digital humanities project that they would like to develop throughout the week.

Media Arts & Science Students and Faculty Go Behind the Scenes of Pixar During Trip to San Francisco

Zeb Wood and Travis Faas, both lecturers in the media arts and science (MAS) program informatics logoin the School of Informatics and Computing, along with 11 students, recently traveled to San Francisco, California as part the Game Developers Conference (GDC).

The GDC, now in its 29th year, has grown from the informal gathering of a small group of developers to what it is today hosting over 24,000 game development professionals, and being the primary forum for those involved in the development of interactive games, to gather and exchange ideas and shape the future of the industry. The conference featured over 400 lectures, panels, tutorials and round-table discussions.

The group was able to tour the Pixar grounds and learn about production operations. They learned about work flow and volume, working on several films at once, as well as pre-production art and the life of studio artists – Everything from eating habits, workouts, yoga, to what it’s like on-the-job.

After the tour, they were able to have dinner and some one-on-one conversation with Tai. “When you watch a Pixar movie, it is normal to dream of one day working there, but to meet someone who was once a student just like me, that is actually working there, it’s like meeting a famous actor. Being able to spend time with him, getting his insight and knowing that he took the time to share his experience with us was one of the best memories of the trip,” said Shannon.

NEH Summer Stipends

NEH Logo provided by neh.govNEH Summer Stipends
Limited Submission URL: here.
IU Internal Deadline: 7/1/2015
NEH Online Application Deadline: 10/1/2015

Brief Description:
Summer Stipends support individuals pursuing advanced research that is of value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Recipients usually produce articles, monographs, books, digital materials, archaeological site reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly resources. Summer Stipends support continuous full-time work on a humanities project for a period of two consecutive months. Summer Stipends support projects at any stage of development.

The Common Good:  The Humanities in the Public Square
NEH invites projects related to its new initiative, The Common Good: The Humanities in the Public Square. This initiative seeks to connect the study of the humanities to the current conditions of national life. Many of today’s challenges require more than ever the forms of understanding and knowledge represented by the humanities. They require the broadest possible engagement of scholars and the public with the resources of the humanities, including but not limited to the study of language, literature, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and ethics. The study of the humanities can help illuminate the complexity of many contemporary challenges while enriching our understanding of the common good.

Summer Stipends may not be used for:
• projects that seek to promote a particular political, religious, or ideological point of view;
• projects that advocate a particular program of social action;
• specific policy studies;
• research for doctoral dissertations or theses by students enrolled in a degree program;
• the preparation or revision of textbooks;
• curriculum development;
• the development of pedagogical tools (including teaching methods or theories);
• educational or technical impact assessments;
• empirical social science research, unless part of a larger humanities project;
• inventories of collections;
• the writing of guide books, how-to books, or self-help books;
• the writing of autobiographies, memoirs, or works of creative nonfiction; or
• works in the creative or performing arts (for example, painting, fiction or poetry, or dance performance).

Award Amount:
Summer Stipends provide $6,000 for two consecutive months of full-time research and writing. Recipients must work full-time on their projects for these two months and may hold other research grants supporting the same project during this time. Summer Stipends normally support work carried out during the summer months, but arrangements can be made for other times of the year. NEH Summer Stipends are awarded to individuals, not to institutions. They do not require cost sharing and do not include indirect costs.

Eligibility:
• Faculty members teaching full-time at colleges or universities must be nominated by their institutions.
• All applicants must have completed their formal education by the application deadline. While applicants need not have advanced degrees, individuals currently enrolled in a degree-granting program are ineligible to apply.
• Individuals who have been awarded a major fellowship or research grant or its equivalent within the three academic years prior to the deadline are ineligible. (Applicants who have held such fellowships or research grants are eligible only if their award period ended at least three years before the deadline for Summer Stipends applications.) . A “major fellowship or research grant”; is a postdoctoral research award that provides a stipend of at least $15,000. Sabbaticals and grants from an individual’s own institution and stipends and grants from other sources supporting study and research during the summer are not considered major fellowships. See Program details.
• Individuals who have received Summer Stipends may apply to support a new stage of their projects.
• See Program details for more specific information.
INTERNAL COMPETITION NECESSARY: TWO FACUTLY MEMBERS PER CAMPUS
Each college and university in the United States and its jurisdictions (campus) may nominate two faculty members. Any faculty member teaching full-time is eligible for nomination.

APPLICANTS EXEMPT FROM NOMINATION / NO INTERNAL COMPETITION NEEDED
The following individuals may apply online without a nomination or internal competition:
• independent scholars not affiliated with a college or university;
• college or university staff members who are not faculty members and will not be teaching during the academic year preceding the award tenure
• emeritus faculty; and
• adjunct faculty, part-time faculty, and applicants with academic appointments that terminate by the summer of the award tenure.

IUPUI Internal competition:
For consideration, submit the following documents electronically to Etta Ward,emward@iupui.edu by July 1, 2015 for internal competition.
Format pages with one-inch margins and with a font size no smaller than eleven point.
The narrative should not assume specialized knowledge and should be free of technical terms and jargon. The narrative limitation does not include references.

1. Provide a 1-3 page narrative that includes the following:
• Project Title
• Project Director Name and Credentials
• Research and contribution: Describe the intellectual significance of the proposed project, including its value to humanities scholars, general audiences, or both. Provide an overview of the project, explaining the basic ideas, problems, or questions examined by the study. Explain how the project will complement, challenge, or expand relevant studies in the field.
• Methods and work plan: Describe your method(s) and clarify the part or stage of the project that will be supported by the Summer Stipend. Provide a work plan, describing what you will accomplish during the award period. Your work plan must be based on a full-time commitment to the project; part-time work is not allowed. If you do not anticipate finishing the entire project during the award period, discuss your plan for doing so. For book projects, explain how the final project will be organized. If possible, provide a brief chapter outline. For digital projects, describe the technologies that will be used and developed, and how the scholarship will be presented to benefit audiences in the humanities.
• Competencies, skills, and access: Explain your competence in the area of your project. If the area of inquiry is new to you, explain your reasons for working in it and your qualifications to do so. Specify your level of competence in any language or digital technology needed for the study. Describe where the study will be conducted and what research materials will be used.
• Final product and dissemination: Describe the intended audience and the intended results of the project. If relevant, explain how the results will be disseminated and why these means are appropriate to the subject matter and audience.

2. A Letter from the Chair or Dean

3. 1-2 page abbreviated CV which includes:
• Current and Past Positions
• Education: List degrees, dates awarded, and titles of theses or dissertations
• Awards and Honors: Include dates. If you have received support from NEH, indicate the dates of these grants and any resulting publications.
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Marwan Wafa to step down as IUPUC vice chancellor and dean

COLUMBUS, Ind. — Marwan A. Wafa will step down as vice chancellor and dean at Indiana photoUniversity-Purdue University Columbus on June 30 to become chancellor of Pennsylvania State University’s Worthington Scranton campus, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Chancellor Charles R. Bantz announced.

Since Wafa arrived at IUPUC in 2009, the number of bachelor’s and master’s degrees conferred has increased over 211 percent, from 80 in 2010 to 249 in 2014; a new Office of Student Affairs was created, which substantially improved and upgraded the quality of life with a focus toward creating a more residential experience for students; and IUPUC will offer its first residence hall–a private hall scheduled to open offsite this summer with 112 beds.

Additionally, Wafa worked with administrative and faculty leaders to add and/or receive authorization to offer complete degree programs and concentrations at IUPUC including a Bachelor of Science in nursing, Master of Science in mental health counseling and Bachelor of Arts in English and communication studies, as well as minors in 15 academic areas. Wafa also created IUPUC’s first strategic plan that reflects the needs of the region and emphasizes the uniqueness of its learning environment.

“Marwan has made an indelible impact at IUPUC over the last six years. I want to thank him for his contributions, insight and commitment to higher education,” Bantz said.

Over the summer months, IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Nasser H. Paydar will meet with the IUPUC community to discuss the appointing of an interim vice chancellor and dean as well as other topics of interest. IUPUC primarily serves students who live in Bartholomew, Brown, Decatur, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Ripley, Shelby and other counties in Southern Indiana.

“I am grateful for the opportunity to have been of service to IUPUC and the region,” Wafa said. “I am proud of what our faculty and staff have been able to achieve during the past six years to help address higher educational needs of South Central Indiana. I wish IUPUC continued progress and growth.”

Book by IUPUI professor puts Native American mascot imagery into historical context

INDIANAPOLIS — Twenty-first-century efforts to legitimize Native American athletic team Guiliano-225x300names and mascots miscast tribal history, argues the author of a book examining the history of Native American imagery in college sports and exposing its ties to a crisis of identity among white, middle-class men.

Under pressure from the NCAA, Native Americans and others, many colleges have dropped their use of Native American team names and mascots. The NCAA has granted waivers to a few schools, including Florida State University, which has the support of the Florida Seminole Tribe for its use of the Seminole nickname.

“There were no Native American tribes involved in the creation of these identities, so why would colleges go to them for approval now?” said Jennifer Guiliano, assistant professor of history at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and author of “Indian Spectacle: College Mascots and the Anxiety of Modern America.”

Contrary to popular thought, mascots do not represent the history of particular tribes, but rather they commingle native identities across historical periods and tribal lines, the professor said.

Guiliano said “Indian Spectacle” points out that “none of the mascots were created with accurate tribal representation.”

Representations of Indians became “tied to mascotry in the 1920s when the University of Illinois — in an attempt to create a half-time spectacle for its band performance — merges with Indian representation,” said Guiliano, who teaches in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Looking at the history of the creation and spread of Native American mascots and imagery, one finds middle-class men who are facing identity issues, Guiliano said.

In the face of challenges to their identity — immigration, urbanization and industrialization — white middle-class men in the 1920s and 1930s used Native American culture and imagery to reduce their anxiety about who they were and what mattered, according to Guiliano, who as a youth attended University of Illinois games and watched Chief Illiniwek perform. Competitive sports provided an arena in which men could legitimately act out their anxieties and celebrate their identity by cheering on misguided, narrow perceptions of Native Americans as inherently violent, she said.

“Because it was a moment when they couldn’t test their masculinity on the battlefield — America wasn’t fighting a war — the sort of battle on the football field became a replacement on how you could prove your masculinity,” Guiliano said. Men who weren’t good enough to play chose to be in the band or to be ardent fans, and they adopted the Indian identity to alleviate their anxiety over societal changes, according to the professor.