Herron School of Art and Design presents pop artist and surrealist Wayne White

Wayne WhiteKnown for his humor and distinct aesthetic, pop artist and surrealist Wayne White will be the keynote speaker at the Foundations in Art: Theory and Education’s national biennial conference, hosted in Indianapolis.

As sponsor of the biennial conference, Herron School of Art and Design is hosting the keynote address at 7 p.m. Friday, March 27, in Room 450 of the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Campus Center, 420 University Blvd.

White is a three-time Emmy Award winner for his set design and puppeteering work on “Pee-wee’s Playhouse.” He has also directed numerous music videos for various artists including Peter Gabriel and Smashing Pumpkins. The artist’s works are held in prominent permanent collections including New York’s New Museum of Contemporary Art and the Detroit Institute of Art.

The Foundations in Art: Theory and Education conference runs March 25 to 28. The conference theme, ‘Tectonic Shifts: Breaking New Ground,’ reflects plans to examine how the forces of change are shaping the foundation landscape. Organizers see the conference as a continuum of the conversation during the 2013 event, which attracted more than 500 artists, designers, historians and educators.

Foundations in Art: Theory and Education is a national association dedicated to the promotion of excellence in the development and teaching of college-level foundation courses in both studio and art history. Its members represent independent colleges of art and design, university art departments, and community colleges throughout the United States.

White’s lecture is free and open to the public.

Following the lecture, a reception will take place in Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

25 IU faculty from five campuses earn New Frontiers in Arts and Humanities grants

IU Vice President for Research Jorge José | Photo by Indiana UniversityOn the heels of President Michael A. McRobbie’s announcement as part of Indiana University’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan of continued funding for the New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities program, Vice President for Research Jorge José has named 25 more faculty members to receive New Frontiers grants.

Considered one of the largest internally funded university arts and humanities programs supporting scholarship and creative activity, the New Frontiers program has awarded more than $9.3 million to 451 faculty members in the past 10 years.

The new five-year extension was the second made by McRobbie after the Lilly Endowment’s Excellence in Indiana Initiative funded an initial five years beginning in 2004-05. This latest round of awards provides up to $50,000 each in Creativity and Scholarship Awards to 19 faculty members from four campuses and up to $15,000 each in Experimental Fellowship Awards for six faculty members from three campuses.

New Frontiers has helped define IU’s commitment to support innovative and creative scholarship with the potential for transformative achievement, McRobbie noted.

“New Frontiers has repeatedly fostered exciting new opportunities for our faculty by integrating the arts, scholarship and creativity, and empowering that relationship with a strong commitment of support,” he said. “This program has allowed our faculty to expand the breadth and depth of their research and creative activity and led to the development of innovative works across a wide range of disciplines. In doing so, it has guaranteed that IU’s longstanding tradition of excellence in the arts and humanities continues to thrive and enrich our quality of life.”

José said continued support of the program validates IU’s commitment to the arts and humanities as a sustaining stakeholder in IU’s mission set down in the Bicentennial Strategic Plan.

“The New Frontiers program, which is unique among major research universities, fosters and strengthens the university’s commitment to transformative innovation, outstanding scholarship, and creative and intellectual achievement,” José said. “More broadly, New Frontiers helps demonstrate the importance of the arts and humanities in contemporary life and is truly a signature program for the university.”

In addition to these grant programs, New Frontiers also supports outstanding and topical scholarly symposia through the New Currents program, and faculty travel for research and creative activity through the Exploratory Travel Fellowship program.

Jean Robertson, the Chancellor’s Professor of Art History at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis’ Herron School of Art and Design, has been a New Frontiers grant recipient and later a member of the IU faculty panel that reviews new grant applications. She said receipt of the award provided her the support, motivation and freedom to attain new levels of academic achievement.

“Beyond the practical benefits, New Frontiers funding has given me moral support and strong motivation. I want to justify the confidence Indiana University has expressed in me, thus I aim even higher than I would on my own,” she said. “I don’t know of another university in the country that provides such generous financial support for faculty who specialize in arts and humanities disciplines, and the sheer volume of research that IU faculty members have been able to accomplish as the outcomes of New Frontiers grants is jaw dropping.”

Recipients of 2014-15 New Frontiers grants are:

New Frontiers of Creativity and Scholarship

  • Heather Blair, Department of Religious Studies, IU Bloomington, “The Gods Make You Giggle: Finding Religion in Japanese Children’s Picture Books”
  • Purnima Bose, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Intervention Narratives: Afghanistan, the United States, and the War on Terror”
  • Judith Brown, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Passive States: India and Global Modernism”
  • Maria Bucur-Deckard, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “The Century of Women”
  • Konstantin Dierks, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Globalization of the United States, 1789-1861: An Interactive Digital Atlas”
  • Jeffrey Gould, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Port Triumph”
  • Patricia Ingham, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “A Cultural History of Curiosity: Part 1, Monkey Business”
  • Sarah Knott, Department of History, IU Bloomington, “Mother: the past in our present”
  • Elizabeth Kryder-Reid, Department of Anthropology, IUPUI, “An Investigation of Stakeholder-Defined Value at Two Contested Cultural Heritage Sites in Indiana”
  • C. Thomas Lewis, Department of Human-Centered Computing, IUPUI, “Participatory Filmmaking Confronting HIV Stigma”
  • Eden Medina, School of Informatics and Computing, IU Bloomington, “How Data Become Law: Computer-Mediated Evidence in Cases of Human Rights Violations”
  • Jonathan Rossing, Department of Communication Studies, IUPUI, “Humor, Race, and Rhetorical Agency in Post-apartheid South Africa”
  • Kelly Alisa Ryan, Department of History, IU Southeast, “Violence, Self Presentation and Power”
  • R. Matthew Shockey, Department of Philosophy, IU South Bend, “The Bounds of Self: An Essay on Heidegger’s ‘Being and Time'”
  • Ruth Stone, Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, IU Bloomington, “Ebola in Town: Critical Musical Connections in Liberian Communities during the 2014 Ebola Crisis in West Africa”
  • Alberto Varon, Department of English, IU Bloomington, “Textual Citizens: Literary Manhood and the Making of Mexican Americans, 1848-1959”
  • John Walsh, Department of Information and Library Science, IU Bloomington, “CoBRA: Comic Book Readership Archive”
  • Brenda Weber, Department of Gender Studies, IU Bloomington, “Gendered Modernity and Mediated Mormonism”
  • Gregory Witkowski, Lilly Family School of Philanthropic Studies, IUPUI, “Donors in a Dictatorship”

New Frontiers Experimentation Fellowships

  • Jim Ansaldo, Indiana Institute on Disability and Community, IU Bloomington, “Exploring the Impact of Improv Classes for Teens on the Autism Spectrum”
  • Lesley Baker, Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI, “Digital Clay — Extrapolation”
  • Andrew Hopson, Department of Theatre, Drama and Contemporary Dance, IU Bloomington, “Using Motion Tracking to Control Audio Playback”
  • Gregory Schrempp, Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology, IU Bloomington, “Science the Second Time Around”
  • Susan Skoczen, Department of Humanities, IU Kokomo, “Electroformed Metal Mesh as New Material in the Creation of Wearables”
  • Rachel Wheeler, Department of Religious Studies, IUPUI, “Songs of the Spirit: Building Bridges between Eighteenth and Twenty-first Century Mohican Music”

IUPUI announces new degrees focused on law in liberal arts and informatics

imagesThe Indiana University Board of Trustees has approved a proposal for two new degrees at IUPUI: One prepares undergraduate students for careers as paralegals, and the other provides a path for students to transition rapidly into in-demand and well-paid information technology jobs.

IUPUI will ask the Indiana Commission for Higher Education for final approval to offer the degrees beginning in the fall.

“These programs are the latest examples of IUPUI’s tradition of developing distinctive programs that respond to student demand and meet employer needs,” said IUPUI Executive Vice Chancellor Nasser Paydar.

The proposed Bachelor of Arts in law in liberal arts degree expands the certificate in paralegal studies now offered by the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, providing students with additional education and training and the baccalaureate degree increasingly required by employers. Students in the past could take the certificate in addition to a Bachelor of Arts degree in another discipline. But that required at least six courses beyond their degree, which burdened students with added expense and time.

The degree will provide students with the theoretical and conceptual components of the law and an introduction to the court system and legal procedures. Students will develop practical, real-world legal skills with courses in legal research, legal writing and litigation skills. In addition, students will be able to tailor the curriculum according to their own interests by selecting a number of elective courses from various legal specialties, including criminal law, family law, estate law and a variety of business law courses.

The second new program is a master’s degree offered by the School of Informatics and Computing at IUPUI. The proposed Master of Science in informatics offers specializations in data analytics, biomedical informatics, knowledge and information management, and user experience design.

The goal of the Master of Science in informatics is to enable students to apply informatics in their respective disciplines. To achieve that goal, the department proposes first to establish the new degree itself, providing specializations from within the school; and then to offer interdisciplinary five-year B.S./M.S. programs and dual degrees with other schools at IUPUI to meet the competitive requirements of Indiana’s job market.

Informatics has become not only an integral part of many disciplines and professions but also an essential skill for graduates.

The Master of Science in informatics will expand career opportunities of undergraduate students and degree holders in nontechnical disciplines by enabling them to apply information technology skills to their own field or to transition into information technology fields.

Kennedy ‘defending reason’ in Last Lecture

Sheila Seuss Kennedy

The old African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child,” goes to the heart of political philosophy: what should that village look like?

What is the common good? What is the nature of mutual social obligation? What sort of social and political arrangements are most likely to promote and enable — in Aristotle’s term — human flourishing? Perhaps most importantly, do we live in an era when such questions have largely been abandoned?

Sheila Suess Kennedy of the School of Public and Environmental Affairs will explore these and other questions in “Defending Reason in an Unreasonable Time” during IUPUI’s 2015 Last Lecture at 2 p.m. March 27 in the Campus Center Theater.

Kennedy has been at IUPUI since 1998, rising to her role as a professor of law and public policy in SPEA and as director of the Center for Civic Literacy.

The Last Lecture offers the university community the opportunity to hear reflections on life’s lessons and meaning from a retired or current IUPUI colleague of exceptional merit.

Reservations are required. RSVP online by March 23, or call Angie Vinci-Booher at 317-274-4500.

Kennedy says she has lived through the women’s movement, the civil rights movement, the ’60s, the sexual revolution, the gay rights movement, recent decades of religious zealotry that might be characterized as “America’s most recent Great Awakening,” and a dizzying explosion of new transportation and communication technologies. All those experiences have given her perspectives she will share on issues such as social justice, education and the nature of the common good.

Kennedy has a breadth of personal and professional experience that can rival anyone; she has been a lawyer (both in law firms and for the city of Indianapolis), a businesswoman, an author of nine books, a columnist for the Indianapolis Business Journal, a blogger on her own website and others, executive director of the Indiana affiliate of the American Civil Liberties Union and a candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives.

The Last Lecture is sponsored by the Senior Academy, the Office of Academic Affairs and the Indiana University Foundation. For additional information, contact the Office of Academic Affairs at 317-274-4500.

 

IUPUI Welcomes Amy X Neuburg, Department of Music and Arts Technology Guest Artist Series

Amy X Neuburg

The third installment of the Department of Music and Arts Technology guest artist series is here! Amy X Neuburg is a really unique musician spanning a remarkable range of pursuits -a soprano of classical and rock vocal training, an electronic percussionist, and a composer of techno looping techniques and cabaret-style songs. There’s only one Amy X Neuburg.

And…The E/A ensemble (our student electro-acoustic ensemble) will premiere a work on stage with Amy!

Residency Schedule:

Monday 3/9 10:30am -11:50am, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 071 A lecture/demonstration with sophomore and junior Music and Arts Technology majors

Monday 3/9 6pm – 7:30pm, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 071 A lecture/demonstration for participants of Girls Rock

Tuesday 3/10 10:30am -11:50am, IUPUI, ICTC Building Room 061 A lecture/demonstration with freshman and senior Music and Arts Technology majors

Tuesday 3/10, 7:30pm, Basile Opera Center 4011 N Pennsylvania St. Free admission and free parking!
The IUPUI Department of Music and Arts Technology and The Indianapolis Opera co-present a concert by Amy X Neuburg  Tuesday 3/10, 7:30pm, Basile Opera Center 4011 N Pennsylvania St. Free admission and free parking!

Amy X Neuburg is a composer, vocalist and live electronics performer who has developed a unique career bridging the boundaries between classical, experimental and popular musics.  She will come to the IUPUI  campus from California on March 9th and 10th for lecture/demonstrations with Music and Arts Technology majors, as well as outreach into the community with a special workshop involving Girls Rock, and a concert co-sponsored with the Indianapolis Opera at the Basile Opera Center. This concert is free to both the IUPUI community and the public!

Amy X Neuburg has been developing her own brand of irreverently genre-crossing works for voice, live electronics and chamber ensembles for over 25 years, known for her innovative use of live looping technology with electronic percussion, her 4-octave vocal range and her colorful — often humorous — lyrics. One of the earliest performers to work with live digital looping, Amy has presented her solo “avant-cabaret” songs at such diverse venues as the Other Minds and Bang on a Can new music festivals, the Berlin International Poetry Festival, the Wellington and Christchurch Jazz Festivals (New Zealand), the Warsaw Philharmonic Hall, electronic music festivals, colleges, rock clubs and concert halls throughout the U.S. and abroad.

As composer, commissions for voices and chamber ensembles — often with looping electronics — include Robin Cox Ensemble, Present Music, Solstice vocal ensemble, Pacific Mozart Ensemble chorus, Squonk, and Del Sol String Quartet. Her acclaimed song cycle The Secret Language of Subways for voice, cello trio and electronics has played at Yerba Buena Center, the San Francisco Symphony After Hours, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic Left Coast Festival. She has also composed extensively for theater, visual media and modern dance.

A classically trained vocalist, Amy has been featured in contemporary operas and recordings including works by Robert Ashley, Culture Clash and Guillermo Galindo.

Amy received degrees in linguistics and voice from Oberlin College and Conservatory and an MFA in electronic music from Mills College. Her many grants and honors include Arts International, Meet the Composer, The U.S. Embassy New Zealand, SF Friends of Chamber Music, and the Alpert/Ucross prize.

Call for 2015 IUPUI Research Day Poster Abstracts

imagesResearch Day, April 17, 2015, provides an opportunity for the IUPUI faculty, staff, and students, and their academic, industrial, governmental partners, and the broader community, to come together and learn more about the research enterprise at IUPUI, explore new collaborations, and lay the foundation for new partnerships.

Faculty, post doctoral fellow, professional student, graduate student and staff poster presentations are coordinated by the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research.

Guidelines

  • Abstracts will be competitively selected for poster presentation on the basis of scholarship, research and creative activity
  • There is no limit on the number of abstracts you may submit, but only one will be accepted
  • Accepted abstracts will be published as received on the Research Day website unless specified otherwise on the submission page. Ensure you have permission to publish!
  • Poster sessions are 90 minutes
  • Presenters are responsible for setting up and taking down posters at designated times
  • Posters may be landscape or portrait and approximately 36” x 60”. Backer boards 40”x 60” are provided, as are easels and push pins
  • Display tables and electrical outlets are available for select presenters and must be pre-approved
  • Have 2-3 minutes of talking points prepared to “present” your work as attendees view your poster

Abstract Format
Title
Authors
Affiliations
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

  • No limit on title length
  • List authors and their affiliations in the style appropriate for your discipline
  • Center justify the heading
  • The abstract should be no more than one page

These abstracts are due March 23, 2015. Applicants will be notified of the status of their submission after March 27, 2015.

Submit your abstract here

Women Creating Excellence at IUPUI for Women’s History Month

May Wright Sewall encouraged Indiana University to establish courses of lectures in Indiana starting in 1891. These courses grew into the Indianapolis Extension that became IUPUI. | PHOTO COURTESY IUPUI SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES

IUPUI celebrates its commitment to the contributions that women have made through a month’s worth of educational events and activities for Women’s History Month.

Women’s History Month can be traced back to 1911, and the first International Women’s Day. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter proclaimed a National Women’s History Week, and then in 1987, Congress passed a resolution designing March 1987 as Women’s History Month. This was subsequently extended to March of each year.

One way the IUPUI Office for Women shows commitment to this month is through a joint venture with the University Library, Women Creating Excellence at IUPUI. This online exhibit recognizes women who have made a difference on campus. Nominations are accepted every year, so if you know any IUPUI women (faculty, staff, alumni, donor, or community member) who have made a significant impact on IUPUI, nominate them using the survey tool.

In addition, The Office for Women is teaming up with the Office of Student Involvement and other organizations, to offer educational and celebratory events for the campus to partake in. The Women’s History Month kickoff happens today from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will feature music, games and about a dozen student organizations showcasing their support for Women’s History Month.

The departments of English and women’s studies are hosting “International Women’s Day” featuring literary and artistic performances. The event will be on March 12 in the University Library Lilly Auditorium. The reception starts at 6:30 p.m. and the show at starts at 7 p.m.

The Office for Women and the Common Theme Project are hosting Emily May, co-founder of Hollaback.org, to bring to campus two back-to-back workshops on March  25 that discuss street harassment and highlight ways to end it. The first workshop “Bystander Intervention 101” will be at 10 am in CE 307, with the second “Street Harassment” at 12 p.m. in the Campus Center Theater.

The Multicultual Center is sponsoring a series of films about important women through history. These include “Frida” on March 5, “The Queen” on March 12 and “What’s Love Got to Do with It” on March 26. All movies begin at noon in the Multicultural Center lounge, Taylor Hall 115. “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry” will be shown on March 9 in the Campus Center Theater. This documentary higlights the second way of feminism in the 1960s and 70s and this is the Indiana premiere.

The annual campus Women’s Leadership Awards will be presented at the Women’s Leadership Reception on March 26, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the Campus Center Theater.

Other activities to note are “Beyond Bows and Pearls: the Impact of Women’s Fraternities on Higher Education” on March 4, “Latinas Conquistando El Mundo” on March 10, a STEM poster session on March 27 and “Being a Coaches Wife” on March 31. For a complete list of events, head over to the Women’s History Month event calendar.

Call for Proposals: 5×5 READ INDY

Indiana Humanities LogoIndiana Humanities and Indy Reads are teaming up to host a 5×5 event on Thursday May 14th. 5×5 is a platform for new and innovative ideas related to the arts. We eagerly seek inventive and inspiring proposals on the theme READ INDY.

We’re looking for ideas that use literature, reading, and/or the written word to create powerful arts and humanities experiences for the people of Indianapolis.

We’re inspired by projects like St. Paul’s Sidewalks Poetry and Maine’s “Stories for Life” alternative sentencing program, the tantalizing blurriness between the words “story” and “game,” and the myriad work of the Indiana-based Center for Civic Reflection. We think reading and literature can address important needs, like sustaining the bonds between an incarcerated father and his child or helping veterans reflect on and make sense of their military service. We believe everyone should get a chance to encounter the beauty and pleasure of literature, in unexpected places and during even our most mundane activities.

IRBlogo-243x300We invite you—artist, scholar, student, organizer, educator, Hoosier—to think big about how reading and the written word can deeply and positively impact people’s lives, and how the creative potential of the arts and humanities can help make it happen in Indianapolis. We challenge you to find ordinary places or everyday experiences that could be transformed by the infusion of reading and words. We encourage you to think of ways that reading together might change how we do our work, how we understand our lives and our world, or how we relate to each other.

The winning project, selected by a panel of judges with audience input at a live event on May 14, will receive $10,000 to take the proposal from idea to action.

We can’t wait to see your ideas for projects or program ideas that will, in the words of Plan 2020, build a more “authentic city life.”

Big Questions to Think About

  • How can the written word—literature, poetry, drama, essays—solve real problems in our city? Can literature intervene where other methods can’t?
  • How can the act of shared reading create or strengthen bonds among strangers, neighbors, families, friends, coworkers, or classmates—and inspire them to make their community better?
  • What wacky, imaginative, singular encounters with literature, reading and big ideas can draw new people into the arts and cultural life of Indianapolis?

Guidelines to Follow

  •  Anyone in the Hoosier state—individuals, collectives or organizations–is eligible to submit a proposal except employees or board members of Indiana Humanities and Indy Reads. We’re open to ideas from both individuals and non-profit organizations, so long as your idea will directly impact and serve Marion County.
  • Submissions must involve the humanities and/or arts (we know, we know—the lines are very fuzzy). Basically, if your proposal involves people having powerful experiences with the written word, you’re covered.
  • Submissions must be received via the online application by Friday, April 10.
  • Five finalists will be selected to present their ideas to a panel of judges and a live audience on the evening of Thursday, May 14. Finalists will be notified by Monday, April 20.
  • Finalists must be available for the event on May 14th from 4pm-9-pm.
  • Finalists must be available for a 1-2 hour meeting with Indiana Humanities and Indy Reads to go over logistics and presentation tips; this meeting will be scheduled at a mutually agreeable time in the three weeks prior to the May 14 event.
  • A $10,000 prize will be awarded to the winning presenter to implement their idea.
  • Only one idea per applicant will be accepted for READ INDY. You can apply again for other 2015 5×5 competitions.

Other Things to Keep In Mind

  • Think not only in terms of public projects but also of public programs that can engage a neighborhood, a community or a city in imagining a brighter future for Marion County.
  • You may propose a stand-alone project, program or series, or explain how the $10,000 prize will help you launch a larger, more long-term initiative.
  • The more participatory your proposed project idea, the better. In other words, we’re not terribly interested in proposals for book manuscripts. In your application, share your ideas about who will participate and what their participation looks like.
  • Finalists are often judged not only on the creativity of their idea, but also the feasibility. Do you have a realistic budget and work plan? If your idea requires the buy-in of key stakeholders, how will you get them on board?
  • Is someone else in the community already doing a project similar to the one you are proposing? Do an environmental scan to see if you are duplicating existing efforts. If your idea is similar, this may be an option for a creative and exciting partnership.
  • Bear in mind, individuals who apply must have fiscal sponsorship in order to accept the $10,000 prize. There are lots of great organizations in Indianapolis who can offer fiscal sponsorship: do your homework and we’ll be happy to direct finalists to sponsor organizations if they still need it come May.

How to Apply

Complete the short online application, making a compelling case for how your idea aligns with READ INDY, and what you will be able to accomplish with a $10,000 prize. The application deadline is Friday, April 10; no late applications will be accepted. Finalists will be notified by Monday, April 20. Finalists will pitch their ideas on Thursday, May 14 at Fountain Square Theater.

APPLICATIONS WILL GO LIVE ON MARCH 10; CHECK 5X5 WEBSITE..

About 5×5

5×5 is a platform for new and innovative ideas related to the arts. At each of four events throughout the year, five finalists have five slides and five minutes each to present a creative project or program for the city of Indianapolis. Finalists present their ideas to a live audience and panel of judges. At each event, one winner will be awarded $10,000 to put their idea into action. The series of idea-generating events is hosted and shaped by some of the city’s most important young creative leaders.

5×5 was launched in 2013 by Central Indiana Community Foundation, Christel DeHaan Family Foundation and the Efroymson Family Fund as a way to inspire, ignite and financially support creative and innovative ideas related to the arts.

In 2015, 5×5 is partnering with Plan 2020, the Bicentennial Agenda for the City of Indianapolis. Indiana Humanities and Indy Reads will kick off the year with READ INDY, followed by AUTHENTIC INDY with the Harrison Center for the Arts, DREAM INDY with Big Car, and INVEST INDY with Verge.

About Indy Reads

The mission of Indy Reads is to promote and improve the literacy of adults and families in Central Indiana.

About Indiana Humanities

Indiana Humanities connects people, opens minds and enriches lives by creating and facilitating programs that encourage Hoosiers to think, read and talk.

Contact Information

Alyssa Newerth, Director of Advancement at Indy Reads. (317)275-4048

Leah Nahmias, Director of Programs at Indiana Humanities (317)616-9804