The Kresge Foundation: Pioneering new approaches

The Kresge Foundation LogoThe Kresge Foundation seeks to test new approaches to integrating arts and culture into multiple sectors, disciplines and systems concerned with community revitalization.

Focus Area Overview

Many elements of creative placemaking are not well understood, and that lack of clarity inhibits more widespread adoption of the practice among other sectors, fields and systems. By testing and documenting new approaches to creative placemaking, we expect to gain a deeper understanding of the contributions arts and culture can make within other systems and of integrative processes that can be widely deployed.

We are interested in supporting cross-sector/cross-disciplinary projects that embed arts and culture into local systems such as, but not limited to, municipal departments, community financial networks such as community development financial institutions, community banks, credit unions, comprehensive planning efforts, human services networks and regional food hubs.
Some of the Activities We Support

Pillsbury United Communities drives change for vulnerable populations in four Minneapolis neighborhoods through the disciplined integration of creative practice into organizational systems, practices and multiservice program delivery. This holistic approach engages residents and leverages embedded, cross-sector partnerships to increase social capital and entrepreneurial activity, create safer public spaces and strengthen neighborhood identity.

St Clair Superior Development Corp. in Cleveland employs an asset-based strategy that braids creative placemaking with economic development and the launch of a local food economy strategy. Creative placemaking activities generate new connections and access to fresh, local food, educate residents on how to work with whole ingredients and encourage them to share meals among neighbors. The effort connects to creative and culinary entrepreneurial endeavors through business training that honors place and the community’s cultural heritage.

The District of Columbia Office of Planning is dedicated to creating an inclusive city that has successful, green and connected neighborhoods that feature education and employment opportunities. Its approach includes arts and culture as a core element of comprehensive planning processes that are resident driven, cross-disciplinary and focused on human capital and infrastructure challenges and opportunities.

Intermedia Arts, along with the city of Minneapolis’ Office of the City Coordinator, continues to expand the successful Creative CityMaking initiative across five city departments. This initiative fosters collaboration between local artists and city employees to develop fresh and innovative approaches to a broad range of local issues including transportation, land use, economic activity, environmental quality and civic engagement.
Eligibility

Who may apply?

U.S. 501(c)(3) organizations with audited financial statements that are not classified as private foundations. Audits must be independently prepared following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles or Government Auditing Standards. Financial statements prepared on a cash, modified cash, compilation or review basis do not qualify.

Examples of applicants include:

Anchor institutions in any sector that have a stake in and are located in a low-income disinvested community. Such organizations often have a longstanding presence, are large or small employers and operate or are located in a facility through either a long-term lease or direct ownership. These might include arts and cultural institutions of all disciplines and sizes, colleges and universities (four-year, community and minority-serving institutions), libraries, health clinics and human services agencies.

Nonprofit artist collaboratives.
Nonprofit community partners that serve as catalysts, intermediaries and/or funders of community-based revitalization, such as community development corporations, community foundations, financing agents such as credit unions and community development financial institutions and neighborhood associations.
Government entities.

Who may not apply?

Individuals.
Organizations that discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, sexual orientation or veteran status.
Organizations that require membership in certain religions or advance a particular religious faith. (Faith-based organizations may be eligible if they welcome and serve all members of the community regardless of religious belief.)
Programs operated to benefit for-profit organizations.

Who will be competitive?

Projects and organizations that:

Embed arts and culture in larger community revitalization initiatives.
Engage in cross-disciplinary, cross-sector activities.
Exhibit strong leadership.
Include artists and arts organizations.
Extend benefits to all stakeholders, especially low-income community members.
Demonstrate commitment to sustained engagement and empowerment of low-income residents.
Work to ensure current residents can remain in their community even where revitalization changes neighborhood economics.
Honor community distinctiveness.

We do not fund

Planning projects or stand-alone arts and cultural projects that benefit one organization, are on the periphery of a broader community revitalization project or have limited regard for place. Examples include:

Arts education and outreach activities.
One-time, community arts, public art or beautification projects not connected to a comprehensive community revitalization project.
Capital campaigns for cultural facilities or outdoor venues not connected to a comprehensive community revitalization project.
Economic and community development projects without consideration to history, character of the place and integration of the arts.
Neighborhood branding projects.
Projects where resident input is consultative or participation is limited to attendance.
Arts and social justice and engagement projects not connected to a larger revitalization strategy.
Farmers markets.
Community gardens.

Application Process

Our online-application system is off line until July 29, 2015.

We will accept and review inquiries on an ongoing basis through 2015. There are no deadlines.

We have a two-step application process that begins with an inquiry, submitted via an online application system.

Part 1, the preliminary application, contains a data-entry component and several attachments, including a narrative.

If the activity you describe fits one or more of our strategic priorities and our budget, we then request additional information. This will constitute Part 2 of the application process

Bradbury center to celebrate master storyteller’s birthday and legacy with August events

Photo taken from new.iupui.eduAugust 22nd marks the 95th anniversary of visionary science fiction and fantasy writer Ray Bradbury’s birth. The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis will hold three special events in August to celebrate the Midwestern-born author who went on to become one of the best-known storytellers of our time.

From Aug. 3 to 28, the center will present a free exhibit, “Miracles of Rare Device: Treasures of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies,” in the Cultural Arts Gallery on the first floor of the IUPUI Campus Center. Summer hours for the exhibition are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday until Aug. 19, when gallery hours extend from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday.

The exhibit will feature art, artifacts, books and rare magazines from Bradbury’s own collection, gifted to the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI in 2013 by the Bradbury Estate and by Donn Albright, Bradbury’s close friend and bibliographer.

“These new collections include the author’s papers, his working library, 40 years of his correspondence, his entire office, and a lifetime of awards and mementos,” said Jonathan R. Eller, Chancellor’s Professor of English and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

“The August gallery show allows us to exhibit examples of these one-of-a-kind gifts for students and the broader Indianapolis community in ways that reflect Bradbury’s abiding international legacy as a champion of literacy, libraries, freedom of the imagination and the exploration of outer space.”

Eller and the IU School of Liberal Arts are working to expand the Bradbury archives and artifacts into a permanent public display, teaching and research resource on the IUPUI campus.

Two related public events will coincide with the exhibition’s run. At 6 p.m. Aug. 19, Eller will deliver the Second Annual Ray Bradbury Memorial Lecture in the Riley Meeting Room at Indianapolis Public Library’s Central Library. The lecture, “Ray Bradbury’s October Country,” reveals the timeless creativity and somewhat controversial publishing history of one of Bradbury’s most popular story collections on the 60th anniversary of its original publication.

At 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies will host a reception in the Campus Center Atrium outside the Cultural Arts Gallery, followed by Eller’s lecture on the collection’s amazing journey from California to IUPUI and the importance of Bradbury’s legacy in the 21st century. Both the lecture and reception are free and open to the public.

The Campus Center is at 420 University Blvd., between Michigan and New York streets. Visitor parking is available for a fee in the adjacent Vermont Street Garage and in the Sports Garage on New York Street.

Eller first met Ray Bradbury in 1989, developing a working friendship that lasted until Bradbury’s death in June 2012. Eller has authored several books, including “Becoming Ray Bradbury” and “Ray Bradbury Unbound” (University of Illinois Press). He also edits the Bradbury Center’s multivolume “Collected Stories of Ray Bradbury” (Kent State University Press).

A number of organizations are providing planning and resource support for the “Miracles of Rare Device” gallery exhibition, including the IU School of Liberal Arts, IUPUI’s Museum Studies Program, IUPUI’s Center for Digital Scholarship, the IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute, and the Indiana Historical Society.

Popular artists with diverse backgrounds featured in July Herron Exhibits

photo courtesy of herron.iupui.eduWhat do a philanthropist looking for a winter hobby, a prosthodontist who loves to travel, a dioramist hot off a sold-out show and a philosophical photographer all have in common?

Each has an exhibit running July 10 to July 31 at the Herron School of Art and Design, located on the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus.

“These exhibitions showcase a variety of art forms and the creative explorations of artists at different stages in their careers,” said Herron Dean Valerie Eickmeier. “I think it’s going to be a perfect summer show that will offer something of interest for everyone.”

A fifth Herron exhibit running throughout July features works by Eickmeier. An opening reception for all five exhibitions takes place from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday, July 10 at Eskenazi Hall, 735 W. New York St.

Dean Eickmeier’s show, “Water Musings” will be on exhibit in the Dorit and Gerald Paul Gallery. It features selected works created during her recent sabbatical.

Photographer Michelle Given opens her artist statement with several philosophical questions, including: What is the distance between desire and fulfillment when the thing that you want is within reach, but unobtainable? How does one map the width and breadth between psychological and physiological experience?

Given’s exhibit, “The Closet Distance,” features photographs of interior spaces, cityscapes and some video. It will be on display in the Eleanor Prest Reese Gallery.

Stacey M. Holloway’s entire cache of poignant yet whimsical dioramas sold out at a recent gallery show in New York. So she has had to make an entire new collection of works for her exhibit “Rough Draft,” opening in the Robert B. Berkshire gallery.

“Rough Draft” explores the uncertainty of a future and how quickly one small decision can unintentionally alter an intended plan. Holloway uses her studies of animal behavior, the landscape and architectural drafting as mechanisms for metaphors of uncertainty and longing, to build the narratives presented in her dioramas.

Civic leader and philanthropist Marianne Glick took up painting in 2004 in search of a creative outlet in the winter to replace gardening. Her exhibit of watercolor and acrylic paintings, entitled “Recent Works” will be on display in the Marsh Gallery. “Most of the works in the exhibit will have been painted since the death of my parents, which has been a time of great reflection for me,” Glick said. “A Time of Reflection” is the name of her show.

“Reflections and Shadows of the World,” featuring photography by R. Stephen Lehman, an alumnus of the IU School of Dentistry, will be on exhibit in the Basile Gallery. Lehman’s love of photography began while he was a college student.

“I am thrilled to display 12 of my favorite prints!” said Lehman, who gleaned his exhibition pieces from photographs taken during extensive travel across all six continents. “Polar Bears Plus” is a tender snapshot of an adult bear and a cub, walking across a snow-covered landscape.

“This series of summer exhibitions provides an interesting cross-section of the artistic community,” said gallery director Colin Nesbit. “The high caliber of work being created by Ms. Glick and Dr. Lehman might make some wonder why they didn’t just become professional artists.”

All five exhibits are open to the public free of charge. Visitors can park courtesy of The Great Frame Up Indianapolis in the visitor section of the Sports Complex Garage (west of Herron’s Eskenazi Hall), or park on the upper floors of the Riverwalk Garage (south of the Sports Complex Garage) until 6 p.m. on any floor. After 6 p.m., visitors should bring their parking tickets to Herron Galleries for validation.

IUPUI to host program of digital technology courses geared for humanities scholars

Logo courtesy of http://www.dhtraining.org/hilt/INDIANAPOLIS — Graduate students who want to explore new ways of thinking, university faculty and staff interested in expanding their digital skills and any cultural heritage scholars looking for new tools for their research can find a course of interest during a summer institute at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

IUPUI will host the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching Institute on July 27 to 31. Courses include crowdsourcing for cultural heritage projects; designing and adapting digital projects for diverse users; digital storytelling; text mining; and much more.

“The goal of the Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching Institute is to offer faculty, staff and students the opportunity to receive specialized, topical coursework from leading scholars working at the intersection of digital technologies and the humanities,” said Jennifer Guiliano, institute co-director and assistant professor of history in the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI.

Courses are available for those who need an introduction to the digital humanities as well as for those who are familiar with the tools available and need training in advanced application.

“HILT offers a number of introductory courses to help educate participants in possible technologies, methods, best practices and the like. HILT also offers focused attention that allows participants to finish the institute with concrete steps to take to move one’s research forward,” Guiliano said.

For example, the Crowdsourcing Cultural Heritage class will present international case studies of best practice crowdsourcing projects to illustrate the range of tasks that can be crowdsourced, the motivations of participants and the characteristics of well-designed projects. Students will study crowdsourcing projects from the worlds of citizen science, investigative journalism, genealogy and free culture to look for lessons that might apply to humanities projects.

The institute also includes a number of special events for students, including two HathiTrust Research Center workshops. HathiTrust Research Center will conduct an introductory workshop for researchers and instructors in the humanities, and for librarians, on how to create and use datasets drawn from large-scale textual corpora for the purposes of instruction and research in the humanities.

A second HathiTrust Research Center workshop will focus on advanced topics relating to making use of text data at scale through the HathiTrust Research Center’s Extracted Features dataset. Workshop attendees will learn how they can follow a non-consumptive paradigm in preparation for conducting analysis against works in copyright, and will learn advanced skills that build on concepts introduced at the beginners’ workshop session.

Registration fees are $525 for students, $775 for early career scholars and cultural heritage professionals, and $975 for others.

Campus housing is offered for an additional fee with registration before July 1. Registration ends July 27.

Institute sponsors are the Center for Digital Scholarship at IUPUI University Library, the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities at the University of Maryland and MATRIX: Center for Digital Humanities and Social Sciences at Michigan State University.

Registration is available online.

2015 Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Awards goes to Herron’s Yasmine K. Kasem

Image courtesy of the artist, Yasmine K. KasemThe International Sculpture Center has announced that Yasmine K. Kasem (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ’15) is a recipient of the Outstanding Student Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award for 2015 for her work El Qamesha El Wahida (The Lonely Cloth).

In a letter notifying associate professors of sculpture Eric Nordgulenand Greg Hull, Kasem’s faculty nominators, a center representative said there were “an exceptional number of nominees this year; 423 students … .” The nominees came from more than 158 college and university sculpture programs in North America and abroad.

The judges, all from New York, included sculptor Chakaia Booker, Dia Art Foundation assistant curator Kelly Kivland, and professor of fine arts, CUNY, Maki Hajikano. They selected Kasem’s sculpture after deliberating over 952 images of sculptural works, the letter said.

The award includes an exhibition with catalog at Grounds for Sculpture—a sculpture garden on the former New Jersey State Fairgrounds in Trenton. The exhibition will take place October 2015 through March 2016 with an opening reception for honorees and their faculty sponsors on October 24. Sculpture magazine will also feature the awards in its October issue. Kasem’s work will be added to an archive of winners on the International Sculpture Center’s website.

“It’s very good for an undergraduate student to get this award,” said Nordgulen. Although Kasem joins recipients from Herron including alumni Emily Stergar (B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘04) and James Darr(B.F.A. in Sculpture, ‘03), they had already graduated from Herron and were nominated by the graduate schools they were attending at the universities of Arizona and Delaware, respectively.

Kasem said her experiences at Herron have been among the best of her life. “The faculty and facilities gave me the guidance and resources I needed to explore and develop. But not only that, I saw that Herron genuinely cares about its students and their ability to succeed. I owe so much of my success to Herron, my professors and peers. I’ve gotten the wonderful opportunity to work alongside so many talented artists and grow with them in the studio as well.”

“I’m truly grateful for being selected for this award,” she said. “If you would have told me four years ago that I would’ve accomplished what I have, I wouldn’t have believed you. I was so insecure about what I was making and how it held up in comparison to my peers. But all of the positive support, honest critiques and conversations I’ve had with friends, faculty and staff at Herron is what motivated me to keep working hard through any obstacle I encountered.”

As she got closer to applying for college, Kasem said, “I realized that I felt much stronger about visual art and that it would be a better fit for me than studying jazz,” as had been her initial intent.

Once she decided on Herron, there was no question she wanted to study sculpture. “Growing up I always looked for ways to keep myself occupied,” she said, “which usually led me to building something in the back yard, or playing with the leftover clay my mom had from making beads for her jewelry.” Kasem loved making something beautiful out of nothing, but “wanted to work with even more materials, so sculpture was the logical choice.”

Kasem has applied for residencies in Egypt and Switzerland and sees her future at an as yet undetermined graduate school. She’s making new work for a group show in the fall.

“Now that I’ve graduated, I haven’t slowed down at all,” Kasem said. “After that, just continuing my process and hoping I can get my message across to as many people as I can” is the plan.

“Career wise, I’d love to teach, and that’s something I’ve discovered more recently. On the other hand, working at the Herron Galleries has really instilled a deep interest in what goes into running a gallery. But beyond all of that, I want to be a successful artist. That’s what I’m working towards and that’s what gets me up in the morning.”

Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century

Albert SchweitzerDr. Hines Mabika, “Dr. Albert Schweitzer of Lambaréné and the United States of America: Philanthropy, Networks and Medicine in the 20th-Century”

Date: 13 August 2015
Time: 12-1pm
Location: IUPUI Arts and Humanities Institute (4th floor of the IUPUI University Library, Room UL 4115P)
Free Registration (see below)

In 1949, the German-born Dr. Albert Schweitzer traveled to the United States. Famous for establishing a hospital in Lambaréné (Gabon) in the African rainforest, Life magazine had recently named him “The Greatest Man in the World.” And, in just a few years, he would receive the Nobel Prize. This trip to the United States was vital to Schweitzer’s larger project of building an international network of philanthropy that could sustain his work in Africa. Dr. Mabika’s talk will explore these transnational relationships and connections, revealing networks of individuals and institutions that included the Unitarian Church, prestigious universities, and pharmaceutical companies which provided him and his hospital with medicines.

Dr. Hines Mabika is Senior Research Associate of the Faculty of Medicine at Bern University, Switzerland. He has taught the history of medicine, colonial and postcolonial historiographies, and health network management. He holds a PhD in History from the University of Aix-en-Provence, France and an MBA in Health Network Management from Paul Cezanne University, France. He has served on the Faculties of Medicine at the University of Aix-Marseille, France and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland as well as the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Basel and University of Lausanne, Switzerland.

The Genetic Portrait Project: Herron Professor documents people’s perceptions of genetic research through photographs

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek

Stefan Petranek, assistant professor of photography and intermedia at IUPUI’s Herron School of Art and Design, has taken an unusual approach to collecting people’s thoughts on science. With a marker and poster board in hand, Petranek asks individuals from a diverse range of backgrounds to consider “how the future will be affected by genetic research.” He then photographs his volunteers holding their message. In the last four years, Petranek has photographed over 400 individuals creating a noteworthy catalogue of responses that reflect the diversity of ethical concerns and technological promise this expansive field of science offers society.

As researchers’ ability to manipulate DNA for a wide array of biological issues, from human health to agricultural production advance, the influence of DNA-based technologies on our daily lives has grown exponentially. Yet there is little research which tracks Americans’ perceptions of these technologies. The Genetic Portrait Project grew out of Petranek’s ongoing artwork about the pyscho-social implications of a genetically advanced world and his interest in how others were grappling with the same issues. The project represents the first-ever visual documentary of individuals’ perceptions on science.

Petranek has photographed several high profile individuals for the project including Dr. Eric Green, Director of the National Human Genomic Research Institute at NIH, and internationally known artist, Mark Dion. He has also photographed individuals from a variety of backgrounds, including soliciting people off the streets from cities like Indianapolis, Boston, and Portland, OR to participate. Recently, Petranek has focused on creating interactive initiatives at genetic and bioethics conferences. In 2014, he photographed attendees at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) Annual Meeting, the world’s largest genetics conference. His photographs have been exhibited nationally and were recently published in Frontline Genomic Magazine’s March issue. To see more portraits you can visit Petranek’s website and the Project’s Facebook page.

In the near future, Petranek plans to create a website that will allow people to participate autonomously, creating an international repository of photographic portraits dedicated to documenting thoughts on genetics at this moment in history.

Professor Publishes Second Volume of Authoritative Biography

Ray-Bradbury-UnboundFully established in the slick magazines, award-winning, and on the brink of placing Fahrenheit 451 in the American canon, Ray Bradbury entered the autumn of 1953 as a literary figure transcending fantasy and science fiction. In Ray Bradbury Unbound, Jonathan R. Eller continues the story begun in his acclaimed Becoming Ray Bradbury, following the beloved writer’s evolution from a short story master to a multi-media creative force and outspoken visionary.

Drawn into screenwriting by the chance to adapt Moby Dick for film, Bradbury soon established himself in Hollywood’s vast and overlapping film and television empires. The work swallowed up creative energy once devoted to literary pursuits and often left Bradbury frustrated with studio executives.

Yet his successes endowed him with the gravitas to emerge as a much sought after cultural commentator. His passionate advocacy in Life and other media outlets validated the U.S. space program’s mission — a favor repaid when NASA’s astronauts gathered to meet Bradbury during his 1967 visit to Houston. Over time, his public addresses and interviews allowed him to assume the role of a dreamer of futures voicing opinions on technology, the moon landing, and humanity’s ultimate destiny.

Eller draws on many years of interviews with Bradbury as well as an unprecedented access to personal papers and private collections to portray the origins and outcomes of Bradbury’s countless creative endeavors. The result is the definitive story of how a great American author helped shape his times.

“A thorough documentation of Bradbury’s career. . . . This warm, informative biography depicts him as a thoughtful and disciplined writer who helped make science fiction a respected literary genre.”–Kirkus

“Eller captures the joy of creations that new forms allowed Bradbury, such as the intensely visual interpretation of Moby Dick that he wrote for director John Huston. . . . Fans who know Bradbury only for his fiction are likely to enjoy this diverse look at his work and creative process.”–Publishers Weekly

“Intimate, conscientious, and triumphant, a truly profound examination of Bradbury’s accomplishments and legacy. Highly recommended for all sf lovers and those with an appreciation for non-fiction and literature.”–Library Journal

“Engaging. . . . Eller’s second volume of Bradbury’s biography is ultimately a melancholy and cautionary tale.”–Washington Post

“Few contemporary authors have been written about as extensively as Ray Bradbury, but no one has surpassed Jonathan Eller. In his previous study, Becoming Ray Bradbury, he captured the odd nature of Bradbury’s imagination perfectly in the context of his life and age — keeping a myriad of influences and ambitions in perspective. With the publication of Ray Bradbury Unbound, Eller not only confirms his position as the great comprehensive Bradbury scholar. He has also written what may be the best single account of a major science fiction author’s rise to fame and achievement.”–Dana Gioia, author of Pity the Beautiful and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Jonathan R. Eller is a Chancellor’s Professor of English at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis, the senior textual editor of the Institute for American Thought, and director of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at IUPUI. Becoming Ray Bradbury was a runner-up for the 2011 Locus Award for best nonfiction book in the science fiction and fantasy field.

John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Offers Fellowships to Assist Research and Artistic Creation

Application Deadline: September 19, 2015

TJohn Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Logo courtesy of GF.orghe foundation offers fellowships to further the development of scholars and artists by assisting them to engage in research in any field of knowledge and creation in any of the arts, under the freest possible conditions and irrespective of race, color, or creed. The foundation provides fellowships for advanced professionals in all fields (natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, creative arts) except the performing arts. The foundation selects its fellows on the basis of two separate competitions, one for the United States and Canada, the other for Latin America and the Caribbean.

The foundation understands advanced professionals to be those who as writers, scholars, or scientists have a significant record of publication, or as artists, playwrights, filmmakers, photographers, composers, or the like, have a significant record of exhibition or performance of their work.

The foundation only supports individuals. It does not make grants to institutions or organizations.

The amounts of the grants will be adjusted to the needs of the fellows, considering their other resources and the purpose and scope of their plans. Appointments are ordinarily made for one year, and in no instance for a period shorter than six consecutive months.

Applicants should be: New Faculty/New Investigator/PhD/M.D./Other Professional

The Application deadline is September 19, 2015

Application information can be found here.

Talking About Freedoms without Freaking Out

An IUPUI discussion series powered by Spirit & Place, a legacy project of The Polis iupuiCenter, part of IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, with support from the IUPUI Office of Community Engagement, Indiana Humanities, IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law, Center for Interfaith Cooperation, and The Center for Civic Literacy.

Where do individual rights begin and end? Which religious liberties are protected by the Constitution? Who decides what is “right” when our ideals about religious freedom, freedom of speech, and freedom from discrimination clash? How do we get past media sound bites and sensational opinions to really talk about our freedoms without freaking out? Explore which freedoms the First Amendment does – and does not – protect in our summer discussion series.

June 19, 12-1 p.m.
Hate Speech and the First Amendment: Values in Conflict
Scottish Rite Cathedral – FREE
At what point, if at all, should so-called “hate speech” become illegal? During the monthly luncheon of the League of Women Voters ‎of Indianapolis, hear attorney and civic leader Don Knebel discuss hate speech and the First Amendment.

June 24, 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. (reception to follow)
Can We Talk about RFRA without Talking Past One Another?
IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law Wynne Courtroom – FREE (register at mckinney.iu.edu)
It’s fair to say that the controversy over RFRA raised more heat than light. This panel aims to model thoughtful conversation on the constitutional and philosophical questions raised by the RFRA debate. Hear from executive director of the ACLU of Indiana Jane Henegar, IU McKinney Professor of Law John Hill, and attorney and IBJ columnist Peter Rusthoven. Moderated by IU McKinney Professor of Law Robert Katz. 1.5 hours of CLE credit available.

July 13, 5-7 p.m.
Trivia Night
Sun King Brewery – FREE
We’re redefining the meaning of “bar exam” with a night of First Amendment trivia and conversation at Sun King. Grab a beer and your thinking cap and join Indiana Humanities and Spirit & Place for quiz night! Open to anyone 21+, there will be prizes for the night’s sharpest legal eagles.

More info at www.spiritandplace.org.