Fellowship Opportunities at the Huntington

huntington logoHuntington Fellowships

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain

                                               Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship

 The Huntington, an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine, maintains a collection of manuscripts that date from the eleventh century up to the present. This collection includes 7 million manuscripts, 420,000 rare books, 275,000 reference works, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera. The Burndy Library consists of some 67,000 rare books and reference volumes in the history of science and technology, as well as an important collection of scientific instruments. Special collections include those on the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 19th- and 20th-century literature, British drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Art Collections contain notable British and American paintings, fine prints, photographs, and an art reference library. In the library of the Botanical Gardens is a broad collection of reference works in botany, horticulture, and gardening.

These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at the Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014, and must be a United States citizen or foreign national with a minimum of three years U.S. residence. Applicants can apply for only a short-term or long-term award during this fellowship cycle. Applicants may also submit an application for a travel grant or exchange fellowship, but they must provide a separate application with distinct cover sheet and project description, as these awards are reviewed by a separate committee.

Huntington Fellowship

The Huntington Fellowships provides doctoral level scholars or graduate students who have reached the dissertation phase $3,000 per month for one to five months between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. The majority of these awards will be given to scholars working in the general holdings of the Library, though there are specialized fellowships available including the Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England; the Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas; the Trent R. Dames Fellowship in the History of Civil Engineering ; the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships; and the Francis J. Weber Research Fellowship in Roman Catholic History.

National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Fellowships
These fellowships provide $50,000 over a nine to twelve month fellowship between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016 for U.S. scholars who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections.

Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships for Study in Great Britain
The Travel Grants and Exchange Fellowships provide for a U.S. based scholar who holds a PhD or equivalent or is a doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage travel to England, Scotland, or Wales between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. In addition to research that will be carried out in libraries or archives in Great Britain, the Huntington also offers exchange fellowships with Corpus Christi, Linacre, and Lincoln Colleges, Oxford; and with Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Terms for the exchange fellowships and travel grants are as follows:

1. Linacre College, Oxford – A stipend of $3,000 is provided by the Huntington to the recipient of the fellowship before traveling to England, along with reimbursement for economy round-trip airfare. Accommodation is provided by the college with the stipulation that the fellowship must be taken up in July or August of 2015; the fellow is responsible for paying for the accommodation. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

2. Corpus Christi College/Lincoln College/Trinity Hall – Accommodation and hospitality is provided by the college, although the timing of the fellowship may be subject to the availability of housing options and to the rhythms of the academic year. The Huntington will reimburse the fellow for economy round-trip airfare before going to England. The fellow must provide a written report on his or her experience.

3. Travel Grants – The Huntington will reimburse the grantee for economy round-trip airfare before the trip. A stipend of $3,000 will be paid after the grantee submits a detailed report on the research conducted. The travel grants can be taken up as early as June 1, 2015, and no later than June 30, 2016.

Dana and David Dornsife Fellowship
This fellowship is for nine to twelve months with a stipend of $50,000 between June 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016. This fellowship will support individuals who are pursuing scholarship in a field appropriate to the Huntington’s collections. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD by no later than November 15, 2014.

Curtis awarded for NEH Summer Seminar about Muslim American Identity

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Edward E. Curtis IV

The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in Washington, D.C, has announced that Edward Curtis, Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and professor of religious studies, has been awarded $114,438 to conduct a national seminar for school teachers on “Muslim American Identities, Past and Present.”

The three-week seminar, which will take place on the IUPUI campus in the summer of 2015, will give sixteen school teachers from around the country the opportunity to explore the history and diverse cultures of Muslims in the United States.

Participants will study thirty primary source documents, hear from two visiting experts, make field trips to two local mosques, and use the resources of the IUPUI University Library to complete individual research projects.

“My primary goal,” said Curtis, “is to nurture an environment of deep intellectual engagement and active learning in which school teachers can answer a key question of our historical moment: what does it mean to be both Muslim and American?”

In order to answer that question, Curtis will emphasize the impact of gender, race, ethnicity, and religious interpretation in the making of Muslim American identities.

The Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, which has offered numerous seminars and professional development opportunities for young scholars and school teachers, will support the logistical aspects of the program.

Funding for NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes is provided by the federal government, and grants are awarded through a rigorous and selective process of peer review.

“Understanding the rich diversity of Muslim American identities in a balanced and informed manner,” Curtis concluded, “can be a powerful means of bridging cultures inside the United States and beyond.”

 


National Humanities Center Residential Fellowships

NHCEssayPageLogoThe National Humanities Center, located in the Research Triangle area of North Carolina, is taking applications for academic-year length residential fellowships for advanced study in the humanities. Applications are due October 15, 2014 at midnight EDT.

The  Center offers 40 fellowships. Stipends are individually determined, according to the needs of the Fellow and the Center’s ability to meet them. The Center seeks to provide at least half salary and also covers travel expenses to and from North Carolina for Fellows and dependents. Most of the Center’s fellowships are unrestricted. Several, however, are designated for particular areas of research. These include a fellowship for a young woman in philosophy and fellowships for environmental studies, English literature, art history, Asian Studies, and theology.

For further information, please see http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/fellowships/appltoc.htm.

Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art at Yale University offers funding for book illustrations

thPublication Grants (Author)
Sponsored by Yale University, the Yale Center for British Art (YCBA), and the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art – U.K., this grant provides up to £3,000GBP annually in order to cover costs which are the responsibility of the author and are personally expended by him/her. Eligible costs include specific photography and the production of images for their publication, acquisition of images, reproduction and copyright costs, or the production of graphics. Funds may not be used to cover publishers’ production costs or personal living expenses, travel, nor the support of research on the part of the applicant. Supported topics must have an historical perspective and pertain to topics in the realm of academic research and the dissemination of knowledge in the field of British art and architectural history from the medieval period to the present.

The Paul Mellon Centre, an educational charity, supports scholarly publications, in both printed and online form, within the remit of British art and architectural history, as well as books and catalogs of exhibitions or permanent collections of British fine and decorative arts and architecture. It does not offer fellowships and grants in the fields of archaeology, the current practice of architecture or the performing arts. It has no discretionary funds outside its stated program. Publication projects should be ready to go to press or appear online within two years from January 2015. The Centre does not make any retrospective awards for books already published nor will it accept applications for funding for books due to be published before the end of 2014.

Authors and Editors of books which have been accepted for publication for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art by Yale University Press are not eligible to apply for further support through the Publication Grant (Author) award scheme.

An application made by an author or editor will not disbar their publisher from applying for a Publication Grant (Publisher) for the production costs of the same project.

Click here for more information.

Demonstrating extraordinary generosity through legacy gifts

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Alumna Doris J. Brinkman (1950s) remembered Herron in her estate plans Image Herron staff

Ordinary people are demonstrating extraordinary generosity by leaving legacy gifts to Herron in their wills and estate plans. Each of their stories represents something important to them. Because of their commitment to Herron’s mission, their priorities will continue, and their gifts will remind us that we, too, can make a difference in the lives that follow.

 

Read about some of Herron’s friends and alumni who have done just that:

Ruth Lilly
Robert B. Berkshire
Doris Brinkman
Harry and James Esamann
Frank and Katrina Basile
Edith Moore

How do you get started?

Think beyond cash gifts made today. Options include a simple directive in your will or naming Herron as a beneficiary of your life insurance, pension plan, IRA or trust. Click here for bequest language.

As a professional school of Indiana University, Herron works closely with the IU Foundation as it stewards and maintains your gift. To learn more about other types of gifts and various ways to give visit IUF’s website.

Have you already remembered Herron in your plans?

Perhaps you have already remembered Herron in your will or estate plans. If so, we invite you to notify Herron’s Office of Development so that we can celebrate with you. We can help document your gift to help ensure your intentions are carried out in the future.

As always, your support may be given anonymously, if you prefer. Simply notify Herron’s development staff about your philanthropic plans.

Want to learn more?

Herron’s staff and faculty look forward to learning about your philanthropic plans today so that your generosity can be recognized during your lifetime. To learn more about leaving a legacy at Herron School of Art and Design, contact Kim Hodges at (317) 278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu or Glennda McGann at (317) 278-9477 or gmmcgann@iupui.edu

First Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art an unqualified success

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(r to l) IUPUI alumnus Carlos Knox, player development with the Indiana Fever; Herron Dean’s Advisory Board member Conrad Piccirillo; his daughter, Caitlyn Piccirillo; and Indiana Fever star forward Tamika Catchings enjoying the Herron Open. Image John R. Gentry Jr.

The first Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art, which took place in early June, was an unqualified success. Nearly 200 attendees were on hand to play the nine-hole miniature golf course inside Eskenazi Hall, created by teams of Herron students and faculty. The Herron Alumni Association designed a hole, too. It won the People’s Choice Award. The Sculpture Department’s hole, which came complete with students dressed as moles, won the Chairs’ Choice Award.

The event netted more than $30,000 in new scholarship support for Herron students.

Herron Open: Mini Golf Mega Art was selected as a NUVO Top Pick of the Week and featured in the Indianapolis Star’s 10 Things To Do. It was also covered by the Indianapolis Recorder, WTHR’s sports reporter Rich Nye, and mentioned on WFYI’s The Art of the Matter.

One thing is for sure (although at press time we don’t know exactly when) the event will return!

Central Indiana Community Foundation helps Herron’s art therapy program produce a skilled and in-demand workforce

UntitledJob placement is 100 percent for the first cohort of eight graduate students who earned a master’s degree in Art Therapy from Herron School of Art and Design this May, said Juliet King, program director and professor of Art Therapy. Launched only two years ago, the program has developed vigorously, in large part due to philanthropic support from individuals and foundations.

The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund, a fund of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, put its support into bringing together Herron students—who must complete 1,000 hours of supervised, clinical training as part of their degrees requirements—and community members who can benefit from art therapy services.

Herron’s Art Therapy program is one of only 34 two-year, full-time, residential programs in the country—offering graduate art therapy education in preparation for the dual credentials of Registered Art Therapist and Licensed Mental Health Counselor.

Herron currently is working with nearly 30 community organizations to pair its art therapy students with programs that serve youths, adults, the aged and other vulnerable populations. Qualified professionals must supervise Herron’s students in a clinical setting. That requires investment.

Andrew Black, a grants officer of the Central Indiana Community Foundation, said “The Art Therapy grant was in alignment with The Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund because it promotes the making of art and provides important health and social services to improve the physical, mental and emotional well-being of people of all ages, many of whom are dealing with significant physical and/or mental health challenges.”

Frank began work at Eli Lilly and Company in 1937. He and his wife, Irving, became incredibly generous philanthropists. Both are now deceased, but their fund, established in 1998, will continue in perpetuity as they wished.

King said, “It’s exciting to see the full cycle of the impact of the program. We are helping children and adults cope with illness, injury and trauma while the graduate students gain the academic experience necessary to become a trained professional and contribute to the workforce of Indiana and beyond.” She added, “We are grateful to the Frank Curtis and Irving Moxley Springer Fund and CICF for the assistance in successfully developing the program.”

The program’s first eight graduates are Linda Adeniyi, Uriah Graham, Amy Granger, Katherine Hearn, Amanda Krieger, Heidi Moffat, Hillary Timmerman and Natalie Wallace. These alumni were hired by providers including Adult & Child Community Mental Health, MENTOR Network, Midtown Community Mental Health, Season’s Hospice, Legacy House, Meridian Health Services and Gallaudet University that provide school- and home-based counseling, health therapy and hospice care.

Nine students are projected to graduate in 2015 and 13 in 2016.

Black added, “Not only does this therapy provide counselors, therapists, or case workers with an additional and often times necessary alternative method for communication, it also provides some of our most vulnerable populations with a creative outlet that promotes self-expression, increases their ability to cope with their circumstances or challenges, and ultimately aids in their rehabilitative progress and contributes to their quality of life.”

To learn more about supporting Herron’s Art Therapy Program, contact Kim Hodges, Office of Development, at 317-278-9472 or kshodges@iupui.edu.

Furniture Design graduate students imagine a new version of Brunswick Billiard’s most iconic pool table

UntitledBrunswick Billiards President Brent Hutton approached Herron School of Art and Design to connect with the talented faculty and students in its Furniture Design Program. The task? To reimagine the Gold Crown pool table for its sixth edition. The Gold Crown is Brunswick’s most iconic table—preferred by the pros and tapped by Hollywood to serve as the centerpiece of such classic movies as The Color of Money and The Hustler.

Through the school’s Basile Center for Art, Design and Public Life, 11 furniture design graduate students got the chance to create a new version. The Basile Center pairs Herron students and faculty with real client projects. Everyone involved gets an education in the process.

Brunswick views pool as a more than a game. Each pool table is a finely crafted piece of furniture, so the pairing was perfect.

Over the years, Hutton’s exposure to Herron as a Bedford, Indiana native and an alumnus of Indiana University has made a favorable impression. He has spent lunches between business meetings in Indianapolis at Herron, looking at student work. “The thing I remembered most is the freshness of the ideas,” he said. “I really did not see that anywhere else, and at the time I was traveling to New York and Chicago.

“The fit for me,” Hutton continued, “was, unlike an industrial design school, this was studio design, and I thought leading edge in terms of art and thinking.” Hutton considered the leap he was about to take working with students. “It was a risk we took,” he said, “but I tell you, it could not have worked out any better.”

Guided by faculty members Cory Robinson, Katie Hudnall and Glen Fuller, a detailed specification provided by Brunswick and their own research, the students had the opportunity to work on a project that would have been an exhilarating and challenging assignment for a seasoned professional—refreshing the Gold Crown’s appeal to a tech culture and a female audience while retaining its iconic brand attributes.

At the end of June, three finalists remained; Sam Ladwig, Shelley Spicuzza and Colin Tury. When the designs were presented to a gathering of Brunswick Billiards’ top retailers, they met with an enthusiastic response. The students will gain more than a hefty notch on their belts; the first place designer wins an award of $2,500, and the two honorable mention designers will walk away with $500 each. A decision about which design goes into production is expected later this summer. We’ll keep Herronline readers updated as this story develops. Click the link below to hear an interview with the finalists produced by James Gray of WFIU radio. http://indianapublicmedia.org/arts/brunswick-billiards-iupui-team/

Funding Opportunities for Research Commercialization and Economic Success (FORCES)

imagesThe FORCES program is designed to support IUPUI researchers in the successful transformation of their research findings into commercially viable outcomes. The key goals of FORCES are to support: 1) realization of short-term projects that will enhance commercial value of IUPUI intellectual property assets, by facilitating commercialization of inventions, technologies, or other intellectual property derived from existing research projects, and 2) development of research initiatives that show great promise for commercialization of the research outcomes. The next RTR application deadline is September 15, 2014For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://research.iupui.edu/funding/.

Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER)

imagesThe Enhanced Mentoring Program with Opportunities for Ways to Excel in Research (EMPOWER) has been developed to support IUPUI faculty who are historically underrepresented and/or excluded populations in their discipline or area of scholarship and historically denied admission to higher education or that discipline, 1) to become successful in sponsored research and scholarly activity, and 2) to achieve significant professional growth and advancement. The program sustains mentorship opportunities through the EMPOWER Grant Program, supporting achievement of excellence in research and scholarly activity, and optimal attainment of academic career goals and objectives. The next EMPOWER application deadline is September 5, 2014. For grant guidelines and application forms, go to http://res! earch.iupui.edu/funding/.