Medical Student Elective 93ZL710 Dr. Schneider
History of Medicine and Public Health  January 2015
  Medical Library IB 307


SYLLABUS
http://www.iupui.edu/~histwhs/h364.dir/medelect.syl.html

Notes and announcements

There are two talks on the history of medicine onnTuesday at noon. Pick one to attend.

The Early Days of Psychiatry in Indiana
Tuesday, January 13th, 2015
12:00 Noon –1:00 PM
Van Nuys Medical Science Building, MS B26
Dr. Alan Schmetzer, M.D., Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychiatry at Indiana University School of Medicine

The History of Blood Transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa
William H. Schneider, Ph.D. (History Depat. IUPUI)
Tuesday, January 13th, 2015
11:30 (lunch), noon - 1:00 (talk)
Faculty Club (2nd floor of Hine Hall, former conference center/hotel)

These notes will be used for class announcements and reminders which you should check before each class to make sure of revisions. If there are any questions between classes, or if you find any problems with this or other web materials, contact the instructor at whschnei@iupui.edu.

The following syllabus was last corrected on Jan. 12, 2015.
It is subject to changes which will be announced in class.

Competency:
The successful completion of this one-month seminar course in the history of medicine would enable the student to earn a level 3 competency in either Lifelong Learning or the Social and Community Contexts of Health Care.

Class meetings and times:
The course meetsaround three times a week as indicated below. NOTE: most sessions will be held in Ruth Lilly library Medical History room 307, unless otherwise indicated.

Required Textbooks:
Available at IUPUI Bookstore (Barnes and Noble), in Campus Center at Michigan and University. Books are in the History section, listed under Hist H546.

Deborah Brunton, ed. Medicine Transformed: Health, Disease and Society in Europe, 1800-1930 (2004)

David J. Rothman, et al., eds., Medicine and Western Civilization (Rutgers University Press, 1995)

(sufficient pages assigned to warrant purchase; available at IUPUI Bookstore (Barnes and Noble), but listed as recommended)

Thomas Neville Bonner. Becoming a Physician: Medical Education in Britain, France, Germany, and the United States, 1750-1945 (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000)

Norman Gevitz, ed., Other Healers: Unorthodox Medicine in America (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1988)

Other Required Readings:

Other readings listed below are either available on the web, in journals of the IUPUI librarires (usually the Medical Library), or they are available in the "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class. You will be added to the H546 class so that when you log onto Oncourse, you can select the course H546 "History of Medicine and Public Health." Then click on the "Resources" link listed in the left-hand column. The readings noted below can be downloaded from the topic of the class.

Note: Some of the readings on the web require you to give your IUPUI userid and password.

Some History of Medicine Web resources

IUCAT and WorldCat on-line catalog of books at IU, primarily in the U.S., requires your IUPUI userid and password.The Medical Library holdings are denoted by IM.

PubMed: Access to Index Medicus, a bibliography of journal articles, including many on the History of Medicine, maintained by the NLM. A good source of articles since 1964, but not all inclusive. Click here to try the on-line version of Index Catalog of medical articles published before 1964 and as early as the late 19th century.

Journals on-line: for journals available through University Library click here; for the Medical Library click here. Both require your IUPUI userid and password. Best databases for historical articles are JSTOR and Project MUSE.

National Library of Medicine: the on-line catalog of the most comprehensive medical library in the world and best database of medical books.

An excellent web sites with reference materials in the history of medicine are at the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine (see especially its image database), and MedHist: a guide to history of medicine resources at the Wellcome History of Medicine Library in London

Websites in Medical History (maintained by the Institute of Historical Research at the University of London)

Historical Abstracts/American History and Life : The most complete databases of articles on history in general, requires your IUPUI userid and password.

Who Named It? despite its title, a very comprehensive dictionary and encyclopedia about the origin of medical terms. Self described goal: " It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical phenomena named for a person, with a biography of that person."

ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times (1851-2001) The full text of the New York Times, searchable by key words, dates, etc. [Note: If link fails, go to the University Library home page. Then click on "Find articles" and select "e-journals." Type in New York Times and after giving your username and password, it will take you to the database.]

The London Times, 1785-1985 Full text and searchable online database of the London Times. [Note: If link fails, go to the University Library home page. Then click on "Find articles" and select "e-journals." Type in London Times and after giving your username and password, it will take you to the database.]]

Google Books: quickest search of books published in the U.S., including a number of older books which have been digitized by Google and are accessible online.

Course Requirements
This class will consist primarily of reading and discussion. Students are expected to attend all twelve in-class seminar sessions (unless previously discussed with instructor) and actively participate in the in-class discussions. If a student misses any session, they must turn in an additional 3-5 page, typed, report analyzing the reading assignments for the missed session. (Click here for more information about this report.) Each student is required to complete the two class writing assignments and the final project (see below).

Grade Distribution:
The student will be able to receive Honors, High Pass, Pass and Fail grades based upon the following criteria:

 Assignment #1 (due Jan. 13)  15%
 Assignment #2 (due Jan. 20)  20%
 Class Participation  15%

 Final Project
Note progress report deadlines:
Jan. 11 initial discussion of topics
Jan. 19 topic and initial bibliography
Jan. 26 progress and revised bibliography
Jan. 31 final project due (plus presentation)

 50%

Assignments are explained below. Click here for more about the Final project.

Click on the following for information about format of notes for papers.

Be sure you understand the school's policy on plagiarism (copying). See IU Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Conductfor further definition. Those guilty of it will be dealt with in accordance with the regulations spelled out in the code.

IMPORTANT NOTE:

The time and relative weight of these assignments may be changed during the term. If so, changes will be announced in advance during class.

To contact the instructors outside of class:

Dr. William Schneider
Cavanaugh Hall 141
email: whschnei@iupui.edu

CLASS TOPICS, READINGS AND ASSIGNMENTS [Click here for a summary of class meetings and due dates.]

Jan 5 Mon
8:30-11:00

Introduction; Traditional Medicine & the Roots of Western Scientific Medicine

Study Questions

David Jones, Jeremy Greene, Jacalyn Duffin, and John Warner, "Making the Case for History in Medical Education," Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, (2014) doi: 10.1093/jhmas/jru026 (Click here, and also available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Brunton, "Preface," ix-xvii

Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, "Introduction," 1-10

Traditional healing in pre-modern cultures

Rothman
"The Bible," 263-6,
Jordan of Turre, "The Symptoms of Lepers (1313-35)," 209-11
Ulrich von Hutten, "On the Beginning of the French Pox (1519)," 212-16

Leviticus, Chapters 13 and 14 "Laws concerning leprosy"

Boccaccio: The Decameron - Introduction and description of plague (1348)

Origins of Western Medicine

Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization,

Hippocrates, "The Nature of Man," and "Sacred Disease," 43-47; 139-44

Hippocrates, "The Hippocratic Oath," 261-63 (See also, IU School of Medicine Hippocratic oath)

Jan 6 Tues
9 :00-11:30
Medicine & Health in 1800

Medicine & Health in 1800: diagnosis, treatment, training, practice, and research

Study Questions

Background:
Skim for the main points and background on "unorthodox" medicine and medical education to 1800.

Gevitz, 1-51

Bonner, 12-102

Required reading:

Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization,

Vesalius, Andreas, "The Fabric of the Human Body," 54-60

Harvey, William, "An Anatomical study on the motion of the heart and the blood in animals," in Rothman, 68-75
[If time permits, see also: William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood (1957 film)]

Edward Jenner, "An Inquiry into the Causes of the Variolae Vaccinae, or Cow-pox, (1798)," in Rothman, 299-309

James Lind: A Treatise of the Scurvy, 1753

Lester King, "The Practice of Medicine in 1787" Illinois Medical Journal, 107(1955), 130-5 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Thomas Jefferson on medicine:

letter to Edward Jenner, 1806 (orig.)
letter to William Green Munford, 1799 (orig.)
letter to Caspar Wistar , 1807 (orig.)

Jan 11 Sun
1:00-3:00
19th Century Foundations of Scientific Medicinefrom bedside to laboratory; research in physiology and anatomy; diagnosis with statistics and instruments

First discussion of Final Project topics

Study Questions

Required reading:

From Bedside to Laboratory

L. S. Jacyna, "The Localization of Disease," in Brunton, 1-30

N. D. Jewson, "The disappearance of the sick-man from medical cosmology, 1770-1870," International Journal of Epidemiology 2009;1-12 (orig. publ 1976) (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Diagnosis with statistics and instruments

Required reading:
Bonner, 142-57

R. T. H. Laennec, A Treatise on the Diseases of the Chest, reprinted in Rothman, et al., 310-13

Bollet AJ , "Pierre Louis: the numerical method and the foundation of quantitative medicine," Am J Med Sci. 1973 Aug;266(2):92-101 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845-1923), "On a New Kind of Rays," read before the Würzburg Physical and Medical Society, 1895. [Translated by Arthur Stanton, Nature 53, 274 (1896).] (orig.)

Additional web resource: The Visible Human Project at the National Library of Medicine

 

Jan 13Tues
3:00-5:30
19th Century Foundations of Scientific Medicine: Anesthesia, Antisepsis and Surgery, 1800-1900

Assignment #1 Due:
Impact of medical discovery: Röntgen's X-rays

Using scholarly (secondary) publications and primary sources (published at the time), describe the response to Roentgen's discovery during the months that followed in any one of the following countries: France, Germany, United States, and Great Britain.

The type-written paper should be 3-4 pages in length. Identify your sources, at least one of which must be a scientific article from that time. Another useful source is the ProQuest Historical Newspapers: The New York Times (1851-2001) and the London Times, which gives access to the full text of the newspapers, searchable by key words, dates, etc. [Note: requires login with student ID and Password].

To find sources for earlier scientific publications, click here for the on-line version of Index Catalog of medical articles published before 1964. Many of the earlier journals have been digitized and are available online, as well as the originals being available in the medical library.

In a separate bibliographic section comment on the utility of each source. You should have between 5 to 7 sources. Click on the following for information about format of notes for papers.

**Be prepared to discuss your findings in class.**

Anesthesia, Antisepsis and Surgery, 1800-1900

Study Questions

Thomas Schlich, "The Emergence of Modern Surgery," in Brunton, 61-91

John Brown, "Rab and His Friends" (~1830) (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Frances Burney, "A Mastectomy: letter of September 30, 1811," reprinted in Rothman, et al., 383-89

Henry Jacob Bigelow, "Insensibility During Surgical Operations Produced By Inhalation" Boston Medical And Surgical Journal (1846), 309-17 (orig.)

Click here for background.

Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization,

"Answer to the Religious Objections to the Use of Ether in Obstetrics and Surgery" by James Young Simpson (1849), Rothman, 398-401

Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis."The Etiology, Concept, and Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever (1861)," Rothman, 240-46

Joseph Lister (1827-1912), "On the Antiseptic Principle Of The Practice Of Surgery," 1867, Rothman, 247-52

James Le Fanu, The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine, Chapter 5 "Open-Heart Surgery - The Last Frontier" pp 63-84 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Jan 14 Wed
9:00-11:30pm*
The Laboratory, Germ Theory and Tropical Medicine

NOTE: Class will meet at the
Indiana Medical History Museum
3045 W. Vermont Street
For directions from campus, click here; and for a map, vist the museum website.

Study Questions

The Laboratory and Germ Theory

Deborah Brunton, "The Rise of Laboratory Medicine," 92-117

Florence Nightingale, "Notes on Hospitals (1859)," Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, 360-64 (reread)

Koch R , "The Aetiology of tuberculosis (1882)" Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, 319-29

The Laboratory and Tropical Medicine

Michael Worboys, "Colonial and Imperial Medicine," in Brunton, 211-38

Myron Echenburg, "Pestis Redux: The Intial Years of the Third Bubonic Plague Pandemic, 1891-1901," Journal of World History, 13 (2002), 429-49 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class; or available online at University Library, online periodicals.)

Jan 15 Thurs
9:00-11:30
Modern Nursing and Hospitals

Study Questions

Modern Nursing

Required reading:

Maxine Rhodes, "Women in Medicine: Doctors and Nurses, 1850-1920," in Brunton, 164-76

Description of Sairy Gamp, nurse and midwife
from Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit (1844)

"Florence Nightingale: obituary in London Times, (click here)

Richard H. Shryock, "Nursing Emerges as a Profession: The American Experience," in Sickness and Health in America, Judith Walzer Leavitt and Ronald L. Numbers, eds. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1978), 203-15. (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Hospitals

Required reading:

Hilary Marland, "The Changing Role of the Hospital, 1800-1900," in Brunton, 31-60

Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization

Florence Nightingale, "Notes on Hospitals (1859)," 360-64

Massachusetts General Hospital, "By-Laws, Rules and Regulations (1861)," 365-67

William Bennett, "The Geneology of Mass General," American Heritage Magazine ( October/November 198)4 Volume 35, Issue 6 (Click here for article.)

Dora B. Weiner, The Citizen-Patient in Revolutionary and Imperial Paris, (Baltimore and London: JohnsHopkins University Press,1993), pp. 177-83 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Michel Foucault, "The Birth of the Clinic (1963)," reprinted in Rothman, 376-82

David Charles Sloane, “Scientific Paragon to Hospital Mall: The Evolving Design of the Hospital, 1885–1994,” J. Archit. Educ., 1994, 48, 82-98 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Jan 19 Mon
10:30-1:00
Medical Education in the US

NOTE: class meets in CA 141 (Medical Humanities office, 1st floor of Cavanaugh hall, down corridor off the lobby across from Confucius Institute)

"Work in progress" deadline for Final Project: Topic and bibliography due (hand in)

Study Questions

Additional study assignment:

Before class, visit the second floor landing above the Medical Library (on the right facing the entrance) and examine the class pictures from the IU School of Medicine since its beginning in 1903. Write down three observations relevant to medical education in the U.S. in the twentieth century,

Required reading:

Brunton, "The Emergence of a Modern Profession?" 119-50
Maxine Rhodes, "Women in Medicine: Doctors and Nurses, 1850-1920," in Brunton, 151-64; 176-79

Bonner, 103-41; 158-324 (skim for main points); 3-11; 309-24 for dicussion

Philippe Pinel, "The Clinical Training of Doctors, (1793)" Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, p. 343-51

Mary Putnam Jacobi, "Do women require mental and bodily rest during menstruation? (1876), Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, 97-102

Elizabeth Blackwell,"The Influences of Women in the Profession of Medicine (1890)," Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, 282 - 287

Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Doctors of Hoyland" (from The Physician in Literature Philadelphia; The Saunders Press, 1982. pp. 327-336) Click here.

Kenneth Ludmerer, "Introduction," Ch. 4 "Rise of Graduate Medical Education," and Ch. 10 "Maturation of Graduate Medical Education," in Time to Heal (N.Y.: Basic Books, 1998), 3-8; 79-101; 180-95 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Flexner, Abraham, Medical Education in the United States and Canada (NY: Carnegie Foundation, 1910), pgs 20-27, 42-59, 141-146, 151-155, 179-181 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Additional background on establishment of IU School of medicine:

Walter J. Daly, "The Origins of President Bryan's Medical School," Indiana Magazine of History, 97 (2002), 266-84 (available in the "Resources" section of the Oncourse site for this class.)

IU School of Medicine History webpage

Letters to Indiana University President William Loeb Bryan (1906-1934) (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Indiana State Board of Medical Registration and Examination (1906)
Burton D. Myers to Bryan (1909-1915)
Charles P. Emerson to Bryan (1920-1922)
Emerson to Bryan (1923-1934)

Jan 20 Tues
9:00-11:30
The Development of Alternative Health Care in the US

Assignment #2 due:

Write a brief (6 to 8 pages total) type-written on one of the following:

a biographical sketch on an important individual who figures in your research paper,

or on any two individuals from the list below, in which you:

-compare and contrast what influenced the individuals,
-the historically significant facts in their lives (ie. what they did), and
-the episodes, events, discoveries, acts, etc which make the individuals historically important.

 Elizabeth Blackwell  Rosalind Franklin
 Helen Taussig  Margaret Sanger
 Virginia Apgar  Dorothea Dix
 Anne Hutchinson  Mary Breckinridge
 Mary Putnam Jacobi  Mary Baker Eddy
Julia Bell Marie Stopes

Use and identify your sources in a separate bibliographic section, commenting on their utility; you should have one primary source per individual, and a total of four to five per individual.

The Development of Alternative Health Care in the US

Study Questions

Readings:

Gevitz, 124-56; 192-214

David Eisenberg, et al., "Unconventional Medicine in the United States," NEJM, 328 (Jan. 28, 1993), 246-52

David Eisenberg, "Advising patients who seek alternative medical therapies." Annals of Internal Medicine, 1997 (127): 61-69 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

JAMA editorial, "Alternative Medicine Meets Science," 280:1618-19 (Nov. 11,
1998) (click here for original in Ovid database.)

NIH, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, "The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States: Cost data" (2009) Click here (Also available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Jan 23 Fri
9:00-11:30
19th - 20th Century public health and eugenics

Guest lecture: Angela Gonda, Radiology resident, "The Radium Girls"(Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Study Questions
Required reading:
Deborah Brunton, "Dealing With Disease in Populations: Public Health, 1830-1880," 180-210
Paul Weindling, "From Germ Theory to Social Medicine: Public Health, 1880-1930," in Brunton, 239-65

Edwin Chadwick , "Report on the Sanitary Conditions of the Labouring Population of Great Britain (1842)" Rothman, Medicine and Western Civilization, 217-39

Bill Bynum, "The McKeown thesis," The Lancet, Volume 371, Issue 9613, Pages 644 - 645, 23 February 2008 (Available online at University Library, Electronic Journal List; contact instructor if you have problems locating article; also available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Duffy, John. "Bacteriology Revolutionizes Public health," and "State Health Boards...," in The Sanitarians: A History of American Public Health (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1990), pp. 193-204; 221-38 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Elmore JG, Feinstein AR., "Joseph Goldberger: an unsung hero of American clinical epidemiology," Ann Intern Med. 1994 Sep 1;121(5):372-5 (original)

Eugenics

Pernick, Martin S. "Eugenics and public health in American history." American Journal of Public Health, 1997 (87): 1767-1772 (original)

Jason S. Lantzer and Alexandra Minna Stern, “Building A Fit Society: Indiana's Eugenics Crusaders” Traces of Indiana and Midwestern History, (Winter 2007): 4-11 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Fit to Breed? The History and Legacy of Indiana Eugenics, 1907-2007: a virtual website based on an exhibit about the history of eugenics in Indiana that appeared at the Indiana State Library in 2007.

Additional web resource:

Water filtration and typhoid fever death rates
Recent statistics on world health and income (or view a lecture by Hans Rosling)

Image Archive on the American Eugenics Movement

Website for film, Tomorrow's Children" (1934) [Note: Wait for initial commercial to be played. Click here for alternate site]

Jan 26 Mon
noon-2:30
Miracle Drugs; WWII: War and Medicine

Note: "Work in progress" deadline for Final Project: Topic and bibliography due (hand in)

Study Questions

Miracle Drugs

Required reading:

Three "miracle" drugs: insulin, penicillin, and streptomycin

Bernhard Witkop, "Paul Ehrlich and His Magic Bullets - Revisited," Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, vol. 143 (December 1999), 540-57(Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

James Le Fanu, The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine, "1941: Penicillin" pp 5-15; "A Cornucopia of New Drugs," pp 175-86; "The Dearth of New Drugs," pp 215-20 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Michael Bliss, "Resurrections in Toronto: The Emergence of Insulin," Hormone Research, 2005;64(suppl 2): 98-102

Presentation speech for Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1945, to Sir Alexander Fleming, Doctor Ernst B. Chain, and Sir Howard Florey

Presentation speech for Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1952 to Selman Waksman

 

WWII: War and Medicine

Required reading:

Roger Cooter, "Medicine in War," in Brunton, 331-63

John Keegan, "Introduction," A History of Military Medicine, Richard A. Gabriel and Karen S. Metz (1994), vol 1: xi-xiii (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Schneider, "Blood Transfusion in Peace and War, 1900-1918," Soc. Hist. Med., 1997, 10, 105-26 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

E.C. Andrus, "Foreward", and Chester S. Keefer, "Part 9: Penicillin: A Wartime Achievement," in Advances in Military Medicine, eds. E.C. Andrus et al. (Boston: Little, Brown, 1948), 1:xli-xlviii; 2: 717-22 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Additional web resource:

World War I: The medical Front
U.S. Army Medical Department: Office of Medical History

Second deadline for Final Project: full outline and bibliography due; rough drafts encouraged

Jan 27 Tues
9:00-11:30
Trends after 1945 (1): End of the Golden Age and access to healthcare

Trends after 1945: patients and medicine; The end of the "golden age;" access to healthcare, 1965 -1985

Study Questions

Required reading:

Burnham, John C. "American medicine's golden age: What happened to it?" Science, 215 (March 19, 1982), 1474-79 (available online at University Library, online periodicals, click here)

Allan M. Brandt and Martha Gardner, ""The Golden Age of Medicine?"in Medicine in the Twentieth Century,
Roger Cooter and John Pickstone eds., (Netherlands: Harwood Academic Publishing, 2000), pp.
21-37 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

James le Fanu, "The Fall of Medicine," Prospect Magazine, 43 (July 1999) (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Access to healthcare

"The NHS's 50th Anniversary, BMJ Vol. 317 4 July 1998, 97-107(Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

-Michael Portillo, "Something to celebrate: The Bevan legacy"
-David Morrell, "As I recall"
-Charles Webster, "The BMA and the NH"

Ronald L. Numbers, “The Third Party: Health Insurance in America,” in Sickness and Health in America, ed. by Judith Walzer Leavitt and Ronald L. Numbers (3rd ed.; Madison, Wis., 1997), 269-83 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Aaron Carroll, "Support for National Health Insurance among U.S. Physicians: 5 Years Later," Annals of Internal Medicine, 148 (2008), 566-7

Peter Conrad, "The shifting engines of medicalization," J Health Soc Behav. 2005 Mar;46(1):3-14 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Jan 29 Thurs
9:00-11:30
Trends after 1945 (2): Bioethics and race; medical education after Flexner

Trends after 1945: Bioethics and race

Study Questions

Required reading:
Rothman
Pius XXII, "The prolongation of Life(1958)," 417-420
"A Definition of Irreversible Coma(1968)," 421-25

Brandt AM (1978) "Racism and Research: The case of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study," The Hastings Center 8:21-29 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Trends after 1945: Medical education today in historical perspective

Required reading:
Kenneth Ludmerer, Time to Heal (N.Y.: Basic Books, 1998), 180-95 (Available in "Resources" section of Oncourse site for this class)

Carol Carraccio, et al, "Shifting Paradigms: From Flexner to Competencies," Academic Medicine 2002; 77:361-367 (available online at University Library, online periodicals, click here)

Jan 31 Sat
noon-1:30
Final Project Due

Note: Class will meet in Ruth Lilly library Room 307 on this date for lunch and presentation of final projects by students.