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The midterm exam is a take-home essay exam.  Answer each of the essay questions thoroughly.  You may use any notes, books, or consultations with fellow students to complete the essays, but please submit original responses and do not pen corporate essays with other students.

The completed exam should be typed and double spaced.  Please spell-check your final paper and review your grammar.  The essay is due in class Wednesday March 10.  If you have any questions, email me.

I. Non-negotiable essay: you must answer this essay.

1. Define historical archaeology using the definition presented in class. Identify and explain each of the five elements in the definition.

II. You must answer either ONE of these two questions.

2. What does collecting do? What are the characteristics of a "good" collection? Identify an example of something you or somebody you know well collects: how does this collection fit (or confound) our definition of what defines a "good" collection?

3. What is multivalence?  Identify one multivalent material object:  How is it multivalent, what range of meanings is ascribed to that object, and how can various people identify this wide a range of meanings for that one thing?

III. You must answer either ONE of these two questions.

4. What are Colonial Williamsburg’s central interpretive goals? How do they address these goals?  Why did Rockefeller become interested in reconstructing Colonial Williamsburg when he did, and why did he favor constructing it in particular ways?

5. What is Georgianization?  How does Deetz define medieval and Georgian mindsets in three classes of material culture?

IV. You must answer either ONE of these two questions.

6. Neil Silberman argues that contemporary Middle Eastern archaeologies focus on particular periods and ignore others. Why do these modern states do this, and why are they ignoring periods such as the Ottoman? Why does Silberman believe we should study something as innocuous as Ottoman pipes?

7. How does Mark Leone argue that colonial gardens are ideological? How do these gardens physically manipulate a viewer’s line of sight? Leone suggests that the gardens’ gentry builders were in danger of losing their social position at the time of the Revolution: what does he believe the colonial gentry is saying about its social position through gardens? How would a garden symbolically eliminate doubts about prevailing social order in the colonial Chesapeake?

V. Yet another non-negotiable essay: you must answer this essay.

8. Why is this class focused on defining historical archaeology as an archaeology of capitalism? How do you think the class be different if we defined it as, for instance, the period after 1492, or the archaeology of literate societies, or the spread of European culture? What did you suppose historical archaeology meant before the semester began? How is the class different, if at all?

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Last updated February 23, 2004