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Von Schlegell sculpture

The Campus : Galleries and Public Art


Von Schlegell Sculpture

Von Schlegell Sculpture - Courtesy of University Library Special Collections & Archives #UA24-005163s
The Von Schlegell sculptures are sometimes considered the largest benches on campus.

One of the most notable—and mysterious—public art pieces on the IUPUI campus is a public environmental sculpture created by late renowned artist David Von Schlegell of the Yale School of Fine Arts.

The untitled piece, comprised of three identical 55-foot-tall L-shaped pieces of stainless steel, was designed on the theme of a Pythagorean triangle and was funded by IUPUI and the National Endowment for the Arts under the "Works of Art in Public Spaces" program. The Pythagorean theorem has been held to represent traditions of math, logic and wisdom.

Von Schlegell Sculpture - Courtesy of University Library Special Collections & Archives #UA24-004270n
Sculptor David Von Schlegell poses during installation in 1980. Is this evidence that the sculptor realized the practical application of the piece?

The sculptor's works have graced such places as the cities of Boston, San Francisco, Cincinnati, Hartford, and Miami, as well as artistic centers such as the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Rhode Island School of Design.

Von Schlegell, both a painter and sculptor in addition to his work as a faculty member at the Yale School of Fine Arts, often created his pieces based on materials (aluminum, stainless steel and wood) and designs befitting his twin passions: aircraft and boats.

Other Works:
» Westward, Cincinnati, Ohio
» Marina, Miami, Ohio
» Untitled, forms a square shadow