September 1998


The Chronicle of Higher Education reported recently that enrollment in U.S. colleges and universities may total 14.6 million this fall an all time high according to the federal Department of Education. Along with other Indiana institutions, IUPUI's fall enrollment also reflects the good news that more people are going to college.

At IUPUI, 27,821 students have signed up for classes, up 2.9 percent from last year and the second highest total enrollment in campus history. IUPUI students are taking an all-time record high of 275,071 credit hours. The percentage of full-time students at IUPUI continues to grow, from 51.9 percent last fall to 52.6 percent this year. Minority students constitute 14.4 percent of this year's total enrollment. African Americans make up 10.1 percent of the student population, up from 9.9 percent last fall. More enrollment statistics are available at http://www.iupui.edu/it/ace/enrollment.html

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U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley will receive the first IUPUI Urban University Medal at next month's dedication of University College. The medal is awarded to those who best represent the urban universities' commitment to the economic, educational and social progress of our nation's cities.

We are honored to award Secretary Riley this recognition. As governor of South Carolina from 1978 to 1986, his Education Improvement Act built broad-based support for the state's then-lagging public schools by linking additional funding to strict performance standards. It has become a national model for school reform. As Secretary of Education, Riley has overseen initiatives to improve math and science instruction, cut class sizes and recruit excellent teachers.

His America Reads initiative, will recruit a million volunteer tutors to ensure children are reading by the third grade. IUPUI is more than half-way toward its goal of recruiting 80 students as tutors to serve at 11 community sites, including 7 community centers and 4 IPS schools.

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Is Indianapolis the Seattle of the Midwest? According to two recent studies, the answer is a resounding "yes." Florida-based Policom Corporation, which publishes an annual economic analysis of 315 U.S. metropolitan areas, this year ranked Indianapolis'es economy as the best in the Midwest and the 11th strongest nationally. The highest ranked cities (such as Raleigh-Durham and Atlanta) shared a focus on technology to create wealth and opportunities. Indianapolis was also the only Midwest city to make Employment Review's list of the nation's top 20 places to live and work. The Indianapolis Economic Development Corporation has more information about these studies at www.iedc.com.

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An anticipated doubling of the National Institutes of Health budget -- currently $13.6 billion -- in the next seven years bodes well for the Hoosier economy. NIH funding to IUPUI for 1997 totaled $58.9 million. The lion's share of that amount went to the IU School of Medicine, but NIH also funds research in the Purdue School of Science and the IU Schools of Nursing and Dentistry at IUPUI. IU President Myles Brand has created a partnership with the Indiana Health Industry Forum (IHIF), through which the IHIF is leading a Medical Research Initiative to seek state support in leveraging additional NIH funding. Indiana's health care industry already provides jobs to one out of every nine Hoosiers and has an $8 billion annual payroll.

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IU won out over 10 other university and private-sector bidders to host the National Operations Center for the new Abilene Internet2 network, which will be located at IUPUI. Internet2 may be up to 1,000 times faster than the commercial Internet. Initially, that speed will be used to connect 130 U.S. universities to each other, enabling researchers to conduct virtual experiments, build digital libraries and exchange data in video and 3-D formats. According to the University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development, Internet2 will eventually produce new technologies that should enhance the current Internet as well. Internet2 represents an investment of $50 million by participating universities and $500 million in private funding. AT&T, Cisco Systems, IBM and Lucent Technologies are among Internet2's corporate partners. For more about Internet2, visit http://www.Internet2.org

U.S. News and World Report's annual rankings of the country's 1,400 four-year national and regional colleges and universities, published last month, again placed IUPUI in the third tier. Rankings are based on a complicated formula involving graduation rates, financial resources, admissions requirements, faculty size, and academic reputation among leaders at peer institutions. The third tier includes universities ranked 118 to 172.

Among the urban universities with the same score in academic reputation as IUPUI were the University of Alabama-Birmingham and University of Cincinnati. We're in good company - an indicator of our growing status nationally among urban universities.

Individual schools continue to improve their rankings. The IU School of Social Work is now among the top 50. Currently ranking 12th, the IU School of Nursing is up from 14th in 1996 and 16th in 1994, moving rapidly toward its goal of joining UCLA, Case Western, and the Universities of Illinois and Michigan in the top 10 of nursing schools by the year 2000.

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William Shrewsberry, Jr. has joined the IUPUI Board of Advisors. Bill is executive director of the White River State Park Development Commission and has extensive experience in the public and private sectors. For nearly two decades, he was a plant engineer and consultant for Ameritech. In 1989, he joined Gov. Evan Bayh's senior staff as executive assistant for local government and, in 1994, was appointed to head the Indiana Department of Administration. A native of Jeffersonville, where he served as president of the city council, Bill also serves on the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs Board of Visitors.

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We were delighted by President Myles Brand's announcement that Indiana Congressman Lee Hamilton, who will retire from the U.S. House of Representatives in January after more than 30 years of distinguished service to the nation, will head the new Center on Congress. Based at IU Bloomington in the systemwide School of Public and Environmental Affairs, the interdisciplinary center will place a particular emphasis on public education and involve other schools and departments on IU's campuses in its goal of providing information and insight into the nation's political processes.

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Six students from the Moi University Medical School in Eldoret, Kenya, which I had visited earlier this year, arrived at IUPUI on September 15 to participate in an exchange program with the IU School of Medicine. It is amazing they are here at all.

On August 7, the students were standing outside the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi when terrorist bombs struck the building and killed more than 260 people. Although the students miraculously escaped injury, they lacked what had brought them to Nairobi in the first place * visas to the United States. With the Nairobi embassy destroyed and other U.S. embassies wary of further attacks, their team leader, IU Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine John Sidle and other IU officials concluded that flying the students to the American embassy in London was the quickest and safest way to get the visas. But, there were further delays. Finally, with the splendid assistance of Senator Richard Lugar -- who worked with the State Department to expedite procedures -- we were able to obtain safe passage for the students to the United States.

The newly arrived medical exchange students will begin their U.S. stay in internal medicine rotations at Wishard Hospital and St. Vincent Hospital

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Last month, I was honored to bring greetings on behalf of IU, Purdue, and IUPUI and to present a paper at a symposium on new paradigms for higher education in the 21st century as Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology celebrated its 125th anniversary. Rose-Hulman, an educational treasure here in Indiana, attracts some of America's best and offers these undergraduate engineering students exposure to serious research and the kind of faculty mentoring that produces the highest quality graduate. Happy Anniversary Rose-Hulman!

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Enclosed, with our compliments, you will find a decal bearing the image of the new Jaguar logo for IUPUI's athletic teams. When the logo was unveiled at a ceremony last month, attending students, athletes, faculty, staff and alumni seemed to like it -- I had never before seen a symbol on a gym room floor given a standing ovation!

Gerald L. Bepko, Chancellor