April 1997


In 1994, under the leadership of President Myles Brand, IU embarked on the most ambitious long-range planning effort in its history -- a process which produced the Strategic Directions Charter. The enclosed letter from President Brand and status report on the charter describe how this effort helps IU and IUPUI focus not only on what we have, but more importantly on who we serve. A great university must be committed to the life of its state and nation. The Strategic Directions Charter underscores our commitment to join further with Indiana communities and citizens and inspire new levels of achievement and learning.

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Positioning for the future is the key to success. Indianapolis Power and Light s John Hodowal describes this as skating to where you know the puck will be. All our schools are engaged in this positioning, but here are a few examples from our professional schools that should enhance their national leadership.

A consolidation of IU and Methodist Hospitals is a successful adaptation to changes in health care that should give the IU School of Medicine a better chance to continue its emergence as one of the nation s very best medical schools. The IU School of Dentistry has completed a new, problem-based curriculum which promises to become a national model for dental education. The IU School of Nursing, long recognized for the breadth and scope of its graduate programs, has revamped its undergraduate curriculum to prepare even more nurses for advanced practice and study.

The Herron/Law Phase II project now before the Indiana General Assembly will make it possible to finally bring the Herron School of Art to campus, with the accompanying energy that will be generated by having Herron physically present and able to create strong bonds with other academic programs at IUPUI. This should bring Herron to the forefront. Also, this project will allow us to begin the new law building later this year and provide long-needed space for library and various teaching functions.

While we have reservations about these rankings, we were interested in the fact that the IU School of Law-Indianapolis moved up to the second tier in U.S. News & World Report s recent survey of the nation s law schools. Other second tier schools include Rutgers University-Newark, Southern Methodist University, Syracuse University, Temple University, the University of Florida, the University of Miami (FL) and the University of Oregon.

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Without exceptional faculty, IUPUI s aggressive movement to the forefront of urban higher education would be impossible. It is with this in mind that we proudly report on those whose teaching and research has recently earned Indiana University-wide laurels.

At Founder s Day in Bloomington last month, Dr. Robert Einterz, clinical associate professor of medicine, received the John W. Ryan Award for Distinguished Contributions to International Programs and Studies for establishing a collaborative education program between IU and the Moi University Medical School in Kenya. Recognized as Distinguished Professors for their internationally renowned research and teaching were Dr. Bernardino Ghetti, described by one peer as a superstar in the field of neurogenerative disease, and Dr. C. Conrad Johnston, Jr., who is an international leader in metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Earning the President s Award for Distinguished Teaching was John J. Tilley, associate professor of philosophy at the IU School of Liberal Arts at IUPUI, whose creativity, sensitivity and humor make his classroom a dynamic learning environment.

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That an award for achievement in international programs and studies is named for IU President Emeritus Ryan is appropriate, given the world-wide reputation he helped build for IU during his tenure as university president from 1971 to 1987. His career as an outstanding educator and leader appears headed toward new prominence as chancellor of the State University of New York (SUNY), where he currently serves as interim chancellor. Although still needing approval from the university s trustees, the chairman of the search committee for a permanent chancellor says President Ryan is the most qualified individual to lead what is, with 64 campuses, the nation s largest university. We wish him well.

Sustaining IU s commitment to a superb community of learning is the Teaching Excellence Recognition Award (TERA) created last year by the Trustees of Indiana University. The TERA program recognizes teaching excellence by full-and part-time faculty at IU through cash awards or professional development grants ranging from $500 to $1,500. This spring, 278 faculty at IUPUI will receive a total of $350,000 in awards through the program.

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We are proud of the close ties to IUPUI shared by several men and women recently honored for professional achievement by the Center for Leadership Development, headed by good friend Henry Bundles, which prepares minority youth for business and community leadership. Arthur Carter, Sr. a retired certified public accountant who received the center s Lifetime Achievement Award, is an alumnus of our School of Business, as is Marsha Oliver, general manager of the Simon Debartolo Groupís Lafayette Square Mall, who was given the Madame C.J. Walker Award. Marya Jones Lee, an NBD Bank executive honored for excellence in financial services, is an alumna of our School of Law. Congratulations as well to Esperanza Zendejas, superintendent of Indianapolis Public Schools, who was honored for excellence in education and is a member of our Board of Advisors, and to Ernest Newborn, Jr., the general counsel of Acordia, Inc., recognized for professional excellence. I was proud to serve with Ernest on Attorney General Jeff Modisettís transition team.

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J. Herman Blake, vice chancellor for undergraduate education at IUPUI, was honored last month for his work to enhance African American participation in higher education. Herman is the 1997 recipient of the Exemplary Leadership Award for Public Service from the Black Caucus of the American Association for Higher Education. IUPUI -- as well as the Indianapolis community -- benefits tremendously from his vision and leadership.

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A dedicated team of students, faculty and staff from the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at IUPUI competes against Ohio State University, the University of Notre Dame, the University of Oklahoma and other schools in a unique racing series that features high-performance electric vehicles.

This kind of racing is called formula lightning. IUPUI s entry has won in three of its six outings, most recently at the Firebird International Speedway in Phoenix last month. The series helps foster new electric vehicle technology and causes our engineering and technology graduates to be in great demand. The IUPUI formula lightning race car will be featured in next monthís 500 Festival Parade.

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It is fitting that IU Trustee James T. Morris, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of IWC Resources Inc., will give the keynote address this month at our annual Spirit of Philanthropy Luncheon. Even in a city known for its philanthropic spirit, Jim s record of public service stands out. It includes bringing Indianapolis a world-wide reputation in amateur athletics, battling the blight of infant mortality in central Indiana, strong leadership for United Way, and tireless support of IU, his alma mater, and of IUPUI, where he serves on our Board of Advisors. Junior Achievement of Central Indiana recently inducted Jim into its Central Indiana Business Hall of Fame on the strength of his many accomplishments and his high moral and ethical standards.

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Until a special ceremony there last month honoring IU School of Music Dean Charles Webb and his wife, Kenda, no one in the 109-year history of the Indiana Statehouse had ever played a grand piano in the legislative chambers of the House or Senate. Charles, who retires this year after 24 years of leading one of the world s most comprehensive institutions for musical studies, played a Chopin scherzo and a setting of Stardust by Hoagy Carmichael on Steinway grand pianos set up in both the House and Senate chambers. Our thanks to Darrell Bailey, director of the IU School of Music at IUPUI, who arranged with Meridian Music to provide, move and tune both pianos free of charge. Someday, grand pianos may again be played in the chambers. Whether they will ever be played so well is another matter.

School spirit can mean more than showing up for athletic events. Our Undergraduate Student Assembly raised hundreds of dollars and collected food, clothing, and appliances to help more than 150 people left homeless by a devastating fire last month at the Canterbury Apartments downtown. We re proud of these students for their thoughtfulness and leadership

Using sophisticated lasers and dyes, researchers at our School of Medicine have developed an accurate way to measure blood flow to the optic disc and nerve -- areas of the eye damaged by glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness in the United States. The discovery by Dr. Alon Harris, director of the IU Glaucoma Research and Diagnostic Center, and his team of researchers could revolutionize glaucoma treatment by helping physicians pinpoint damage and treat it with medications that stimulate blood flow. The finding may also prove vital to treatment of other eye diseases, including those associated with diabetes and AIDS.

IUís Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching was formed to promote teaching as an art and to recognize those who practice it with great skill and care. FACET annually invites a small, select group of faculty to join the organization and encourage outstanding teaching throughout the university. This year s FACET invitees from IUPUI are Barry Cournoyer, associate professor in the IU School of Social Work; Catherine Souch, assistant professor of geography in the IU School of Liberal Arts; Sanjiv Gokhale, assistant professor of construction technology in the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology; Marc Jacobson, assistant professor in the Herron School of Art; Anna McDaniel, assistant professor in the IU School of Nursing; and Ann Zerr, associate professor in the IU School of Medicine.

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Gerald L. Bepko, Chancellor